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Social Stratification, Endogenous Contradictions, and Institutional Change


  • David Fairris

    (University of California, Riverside)


This paper strengthens the analysis of "endogenous contradictions" found in social structures of accumulation (SSA) theory. It offers a precise definition of the term, spells out why it is that highly stratified societies are prone to contradictions of this sort, and discusses a mechanism by which contradictions lead to crises and, thereby, the need for institutional change. The theoretical framework is applied to the evolution of labor management relations in twentieth century U.S. manufacturing, where it yields new insights into a similar analysis in SSA theory.

Suggested Citation

  • David Fairris, 1998. "Social Stratification, Endogenous Contradictions, and Institutional Change," Eastern Economic Journal, Eastern Economic Association, vol. 24(3), pages 311-324, Summer.
  • Handle: RePEc:eej:eeconj:v:24:y:1998:i:3:p:311-324

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Aghion, Philippe & Howitt, Peter, 1992. "A Model of Growth through Creative Destruction," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 60(2), pages 323-351, March.
    2. Thompson, Peter, 1996. "Technological Opportunity and the Growth of Knowledge: A Schumpeterian Approach to Measurement," Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Springer, vol. 6(1), pages 77-97, February.
    3. Tom Lee & Louis L. Wilde, 1980. "Market Structure and Innovation: A Reformulation," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 94(2), pages 429-436.
    4. Thompson, Peter & Waldo, Doug, 1994. "Growth and trustified capitalism," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 34(3), pages 445-462, December.
    5. Segerstrom, Paul S & Zolnierek, James M, 1999. "The R&D Incentives of Industry Leaders," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 40(3), pages 745-766, August.
    6. Glenn C. Loury, 1979. "Market Structure and Innovation," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 93(3), pages 395-410.
    7. Kortum, Samuel, 1993. "Equilibrium R&D and the Patent-R&D Ratio: U.S. Evidence," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 83(2), pages 450-457, May.
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    More about this item


    Labor Management Relations; Labor Management; Manufacturing;

    JEL classification:

    • P16 - Economic Systems - - Capitalist Systems - - - Political Economy of Capitalism
    • J53 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Labor-Management Relations, Trade Unions, and Collective Bargaining - - - Labor-Management Relations; Industrial Jurisprudence
    • D72 - Microeconomics - - Analysis of Collective Decision-Making - - - Political Processes: Rent-seeking, Lobbying, Elections, Legislatures, and Voting Behavior
    • L60 - Industrial Organization - - Industry Studies: Manufacturing - - - General


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