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Helping drivers out of their cars Integrating transport policy and social psychology for sustainable change

Author

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  • Stradling, S. G.
  • Meadows, M. L.
  • Beatty, S.

Abstract

Which motorists are ready to reduce their car use and how should they be helped to change? Results are reported from a postal questionnaire survey study of English car drivers (N=791). One third (33%) of car drivers indicated they would like to reduce their car use 'over the next 12 months', but only 7% thought they were likely to. One third (34%) of car drivers would like to use public transport (PT) more, but only 5% thought they were likely to. While over one third anticipated changes in their transport mode usage, and 1 in 5 (19%) would like to both decrease car use and increase PT use, only 3% thought this combination likely. Effectiveness ratings of pull and push policy measures showed motorists would rather be pulled than pushed from their cars; that the old, the poor and urban dwellers would be more susceptible to push measures; and that those residing out-of-town, driving medium and large cars, driving high annual mileage and required to drive as part of their work are less likely to be persuaded to reduce their car use by either type of measure. Other social psychological research suggests that sustainable changes by individuals that can be integrated into individual patterns of life will be more readily achieved by facilitation and support than by coercion.

Suggested Citation

  • Stradling, S. G. & Meadows, M. L. & Beatty, S., 2000. "Helping drivers out of their cars Integrating transport policy and social psychology for sustainable change," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 7(3), pages 207-215, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:trapol:v:7:y:2000:i:3:p:207-215
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Stradling, Stephen & Carreno, Michael & Rye, Tom & Noble, Allyson, 2007. "Passenger perceptions and the ideal urban bus journey experience," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 14(4), pages 283-292, July.
    2. Gärling, Tommy & Eek, Daniel & Loukopoulos, Peter & Fujii, Satoshi & Johansson-Stenman, Olof & Kitamura, Ryuichi & Pendyala, Ram & Vilhelmson, Bertil, 2002. "A conceptual analysis of the impact of travel demand management on private car use," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 9(1), pages 59-70, January.
    3. Anable, Jillian, 2005. "'Complacent Car Addicts' or 'Aspiring Environmentalists'? Identifying travel behaviour segments using attitude theory," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 12(1), pages 65-78, January.
    4. Grotenhuis, Jan-Willem & Wiegmans, Bart W. & Rietveld, Piet, 2007. "The desired quality of integrated multimodal travel information in public transport: Customer needs for time and effort savings," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 14(1), pages 27-38, January.
    5. repec:kap:transp:v:44:y:2017:i:4:d:10.1007_s11116-015-9672-4 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Stopher, Peter R., 2004. "Reducing road congestion: a reality check," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 11(2), pages 117-131, April.
    7. Khalilikhah, Majid & Habibian, Meeghat & Heaslip, Kevin, 2016. "Acceptability of increasing petrol price as a TDM pricing policy: A case study in Tehran," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 45(C), pages 136-144.
    8. Habibian, Meeghat & Kermanshah, Mohammad, 2013. "Coping with congestion: Understanding the role of simultaneous transportation demand management policies on commuters," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 30(C), pages 229-237.
    9. Cools, Mario & Brijs, Kris & Tormans, Hans & De Laender, Jessie & Wets, Geert, 2012. "Optimizing the implementation of policy measures through social acceptance segmentation," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 22(C), pages 80-87.
    10. Steg, Linda, 2005. "Car use: lust and must. Instrumental, symbolic and affective motives for car use," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 39(2-3), pages 147-162.
    11. Bastani, Parisa & Heywood, John B. & Hope, Chris, 2012. "The effect of uncertainty on US transport-related GHG emissions and fuel consumption out to 2050," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 46(3), pages 517-548.

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