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Dependency, democracy, and infant mortality: a quantitative, cross-national analysis of less developed countries

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  • Shandra, John M.
  • Nobles, Jenna
  • London, Bruce
  • Williamson, J.B.John B.

Abstract

This study presents quantitative, sociological models designed to account for cross-national variation in infant mortality rates. We consider variables linked to four different theoretical perspectives: the economic modernization, social modernization, political modernization, and dependency perspectives. The study is based on a panel regression analysis of a sample of 59 developing countries. Our preliminary analysis based on additive models replicates prior studies to the extent that we find that indicators linked to economic and social modernization have beneficial effects on infant mortality. We also find support for hypotheses derived from the dependency perspective suggesting that multinational corporate penetration fosters higher levels of infant mortality. Subsequent analysis incorporating interaction effects suggest that the level of political democracy conditions the effects of dependency relationships based upon exports, investments from multinational corporations, and international lending institutions. Transnational economic linkages associated with exports, multinational corporations, and international lending institutions adversely affect infant mortality more strongly at lower levels of democracy than at higher levels of democracy: intranational, political factors interact with the international, economic forces to affect infant mortality. We conclude with some brief policy recommendations and suggestions for the direction of future research.

Suggested Citation

  • Shandra, John M. & Nobles, Jenna & London, Bruce & Williamson, J.B.John B., 2004. "Dependency, democracy, and infant mortality: a quantitative, cross-national analysis of less developed countries," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 59(2), pages 321-333, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:socmed:v:59:y:2004:i:2:p:321-333
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Matthew Sanderson, 2010. "International Migration and Human Development in Destination Countries: A Cross-National Analysis of Less-Developed Countries, 1970–2005," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 96(1), pages 59-83, March.
    2. Saha, Shrabani & Zhang, Zhaoyong, 2017. "Democracy-growth nexus and its interaction effect on human development: A cross-national analysis," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 63(C), pages 304-310.
    3. Vladimir A. Kozlov & Dina Y. Balalaeva, 2015. "Institutional Deficit and Health Outcomes in Post-Communist States," HSE Working papers WP BRP 25/PS/2015, National Research University Higher School of Economics.
    4. Gerry, Christopher J., 2012. "The journals are full of great studies but can we believe the statistics? Revisiting the Mass Privatisation – Mortality Debate," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 75(1), pages 14-22.
    5. Ciccone, Dana Karen & Vian, Taryn & Maurer, Lydia & Bradley, Elizabeth H., 2014. "Linking governance mechanisms to health outcomes: A review of the literature in low- and middle-income countries," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 117(C), pages 86-95.
    6. Fuse, Kana & Crenshaw, Edward M., 2006. "Gender imbalance in infant mortality: A cross-national study of social structure and female infanticide," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 62(2), pages 360-374, January.
    7. Tausch, Arno, 2015. "Is globalization really good for public health? General considerations and implications for the Arab world," MPRA Paper 64516, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    8. repec:eee:ecosys:v:42:y:2018:i:1:p:119-131 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Mackenbach, Johan P. & Hu, Yannan & Looman, Caspar W.N., 2013. "Democratization and life expectancy in Europe, 1960–2008," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 93(C), pages 166-175.
    10. Arno Tausch & Almas Heshmati, 2012. "Migration, Openness and the Global Preconditions of "Smart Development"," Bogazici Journal, Review of Social, Economic and Administrative Studies, Bogazici University, Department of Economics, vol. 26(2), pages 1-62.
    11. Tausch, Arno, 2011. "Globalization as a driver or bottleneck for sustainable development. General tendencies and European implications," MPRA Paper 33227, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    12. repec:eee:socmed:v:182:y:2017:i:c:p:127-135 is not listed on IDEAS
    13. Moore, Spencer & Teixeira, Ana C. & Shiell, Alan, 2006. "The health of nations in a global context: Trade, global stratification, and infant mortality rates," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 63(1), pages 165-178, July.
    14. Austin, Kelly F. & DeScisciolo, Cristina & Samuelsen, Lene, 2016. "The Failures of Privatization: A Comparative Investigation of Tuberculosis Rates and the Structure of Healthcare in Less-Developed Nations, 1995–2010," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 78(C), pages 450-460.
    15. Klomp, Jeroen & de Haan, Jakob, 2009. "Is the political system really related to health?," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 69(1), pages 36-46, July.
    16. Sweidan, Osama D. & Alwaked, Ahmed A., 2016. "Economic development and the energy intensity of human well-being: Evidence from the GCC countries," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 55(C), pages 1363-1369.
    17. Mamoon, Dawood & Arshed, Noman & Raza, Sidra, 2015. "Investments in Health and Education Help Save Lives," MPRA Paper 82495, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    18. Charlotte Goodburn, 2014. "Rural–Urban Migration and Gender Disparities in Child Healthcare in China and India," Development and Change, International Institute of Social Studies, vol. 45(4), pages 631-655, July.
    19. Powell-Jackson, Timothy & Basu, Sanjay & Balabanova, Dina & McKee, Martin & Stuckler, David, 2011. "Democracy and growth in divided societies: A health-inequality trap?," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 73(1), pages 33-41, July.
    20. repec:eee:socmed:v:190:y:2017:i:c:p:237-246 is not listed on IDEAS
    21. Jorgenson, Andrew K. & Alekseyko, Alina & Giedraitis, Vincentas, 2014. "Energy consumption, human well-being and economic development in central and eastern European nations: A cautionary tale of sustainability," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 66(C), pages 419-427.
    22. McGuire, James W., 2006. "Basic health care provision and under-5 mortality: A Cross-National study of developing Countries," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 34(3), pages 405-425, March.
    23. repec:bla:ijhplm:v:31:y:2016:i:4:p:511-536 is not listed on IDEAS
    24. Khalid Zaman & Aqeel Ahmad & Tengku Adeline Adura Tengku Hamzah & Mariney Mohd Yusoff, 2016. "Environmental Factors Affecting Health Indicators in Sub-Saharan African Countries: Health is Wealth," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 129(1), pages 215-228, October.

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