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Health status and Canada's immigrant population

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  • Bruce Newbold, K.
  • Danforth, Jeff

Abstract

Given the framework of the 1984 Canada Health Act, the health status of immigrants should be similar to average levels within whole of Canada. Yet, assuming equality of health status between immigrant and non-immigrants, or between immigrant groups is likely an unrealistic and simplistic assumption, given unseen barriers affecting accessibility, the restructuring of the Canadian health care system, and problems with the provision of health care resources to the immigrant population. Using the National Population Health Survey, this paper focuses upon the health status of the immigrant population relative to that of non-immigrants within Canada, with reference to diagnosed conditions, self-assessed health, and the Health Utilities Index Mark 3. Findings indicate that, with the exception of the most recent arrivals, immigrants experience worse health status across most dimensions relative to non-immigrants. Multivariate analysis reveals that age, income adequacy, gender, and home ownership are dimensions upon which health status differs between the two groups.

Suggested Citation

  • Bruce Newbold, K. & Danforth, Jeff, 2003. "Health status and Canada's immigrant population," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 57(10), pages 1981-1995, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:socmed:v:57:y:2003:i:10:p:1981-1995
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    Cited by:

    1. Lipowicz, Anna, 2007. "Hypertension among Polish males during the economic transition," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 5(1), pages 61-73, March.
    2. Lawrence So & Hude Quan, 2012. "Coming to Canada: the difference in health trajectories between immigrants and native-born residents," International Journal of Public Health, Springer;Swiss School of Public Health (SSPH+), vol. 57(6), pages 893-904, December.
    3. Wang, Lu & Hu, Wei, 2013. "Immigrant health, place effect and regional disparities in Canada," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 98(C), pages 8-17.
    4. Malmusi, Davide & Borrell, Carme & Benach, Joan, 2010. "Migration-related health inequalities: Showing the complex interactions between gender, social class and place of origin," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 71(9), pages 1610-1619, November.
    5. Gagnon, A.J. & Zimbeck, M. & Zeitlin, J., 2009. "Migration to western industrialised countries and perinatal health: A systematic review," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 69(6), pages 934-946, September.
    6. Hongyun Fu & Mark VanLandingham, 2012. "Mental Health Consequences of International Migration for Vietnamese Americans and the Mediating Effects of Physical Health and Social Networks: Results From a Natural Experiment Approach," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 49(2), pages 393-424, May.
    7. Rivera, Berta & Casal, Bruno & Currais, Luis, 2013. "Healthy Immigrant Effect: Trayectoria de salud de la población inmigrante a partir de la ENSE 2011-2012/Healthy Immigrant Effect: An Empirical Approach to the Health Trajectory of Immigrant Population," Estudios de Economía Aplicada, Estudios de Economía Aplicada, vol. 31, pages 339-358, Septiembr.
    8. repec:dau:papers:123456789/5557 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Monika Sander, 2008. "Changes in Immigrants' Body Mass Index with Their Duration of Residence in Germany," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 122, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
    10. D. Omariba & Edward Ng, 2015. "Health literacy and disability: differences between generations of Canadian immigrants," International Journal of Public Health, Springer;Swiss School of Public Health (SSPH+), vol. 60(3), pages 389-397, March.
    11. Steven Prus & Zhiqiu Lin, 2005. "Ethnicity and Health: An Analysis of Physical Health Differences across Twenty-one Ethnocultural Groups in Canada," Social and Economic Dimensions of an Aging Population Research Papers 143, McMaster University.
    12. Na, Ling & Hample, Dale, 2016. "Psychological pathways from social integration to health: An examination of different demographic groups in Canada," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 151(C), pages 196-205.
    13. Bruce Newbold, K., 2005. "Self-rated health within the Canadian immigrant population: risk and the healthy immigrant effect," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 60(6), pages 1359-1370, March.
    14. Sergi Jimenez & Natalia Jorgensen & José María Labeaga, 2008. "Immigration and the Demand for Health in Spain," Working Papers 2008-38, FEDEA.
    15. Amoyaw, Jonathan Anim & Abada, Teresa, 2016. "Does helping them benefit me? Examining the emotional cost and benefit of immigrants' pecuniary remittance behaviour in Canada," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 153(C), pages 182-192.
    16. Dean R. Lillard & Anna Manzoni, 2012. "International Migration as Occupational Mobility," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 498, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
    17. McDonald, James Ted & Kennedy, Steven, 2005. "Is migration to Canada associated with unhealthy weight gain? Overweight and obesity among Canada's immigrants," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 61(12), pages 2469-2481, December.
    18. Lu, Yao, 2010. "Rural-urban migration and health: Evidence from longitudinal data in Indonesia," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 70(3), pages 412-419, February.
    19. Edge, Sara & Newbold, K. Bruce & McKeary, Marie, 2014. "Exploring socio-cultural factors that mediate, facilitate, & constrain the health and empowerment of refugee youth," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 117(C), pages 34-41.
    20. Shahin Shooshtari & Carol Harvey & Evelyn Ferguson & Tuula Heinonen & Syeed Khan, 2014. "Effects of Remittance Behavior on the Lives of Recent Immigrants to Canada from the Philippines: A Population-Based Longitudinal Study," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 35(1), pages 95-105, March.
    21. Zunzunegui, Maria-Victoria & Forster, Mathieu & Gauvin, Lise & Raynault, Marie-France & Douglas Willms, J., 2006. "Community unemployment and immigrants' health in Montreal," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 63(2), pages 485-500, July.
    22. Veenstra, Gerry, 2009. "Racialized identity and health in Canada: Results from a nationally representative survey," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 69(4), pages 538-542, August.
    23. Dean, Jennifer Asanin & Wilson, Kathi, 2010. ""My health has improved because I always have everything I need here...": A qualitative exploration of health improvement and decline among immigrants," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 70(8), pages 1219-1228, April.

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