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Changing geographies of care: employing the concept of therapeutic landscapes as a framework in examining home space

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  • Williams, Allison

Abstract

Changes in health care service delivery have resulted in the transfer of care from formal spaces such as hospitals and institutions towards informal settings such as home. Due to the degree of this transfer, it is increasingly important for geographers to explore the experience and meaning of these changing geographies of care in order to reveal and understand the impact and effect on particular individuals and places. Recognizing that the home environment not only designates a dwelling but also represents a multitude of meanings (such as personal identity, security and privacy) that likely vary according to class, ethnicity and family size (among other socio-demographic variables), it presents a complex site for study. This paper suggests research directions to further understand the role of caregiving in contributing to the experience and meaning of the home environment by informal caregivers, the majority of which are women. Using a political economy approach, this paper first reviews the reorganization of health care services and discusses how this is reshaping the experience of informal caregivers at home. A review of the place identity literature contextualizes the specific discussion of the literature on the meaning of home, both of which are then critically examined. Next, the concept of therapeutic landscapes is discussed as an idealized framework to explore the health-promoting properties of home on informal caregivers. Questions for research are outlined before conclusions highlight how research on home space can allow a better understanding of the impact and effect of caregiving on family caregivers and the places where they live. Such research can inform the changes and trends in health care service policy.

Suggested Citation

  • Williams, Allison, 2002. "Changing geographies of care: employing the concept of therapeutic landscapes as a framework in examining home space," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 55(1), pages 141-154, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:socmed:v:55:y:2002:i:1:p:141-154
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    Cited by:

    1. Völker, Sebastian & Kistemann, Thomas, 2013. "“I'm always entirely happy when I'm here!” Urban blue enhancing human health and well-being in Cologne and Düsseldorf, Germany," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 78(C), pages 113-124.
    2. English, Jennifer & Wilson, Kathi & Keller-Olaman, Sue, 2008. "Health, healing and recovery: Therapeutic landscapes and the everyday lives of breast cancer survivors," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 67(1), pages 68-78, July.
    3. Wilton, Robert & DeVerteuil, Geoffrey, 2006. "Spaces of sobriety/sites of power: Examining social model alcohol recovery programs as therapeutic landscapes," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 63(3), pages 649-661, August.
    4. repec:eee:socmed:v:183:y:2017:i:c:p:88-96 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Plane, Jocelyn & Klodawsky, Fran, 2013. "Neighbourhood amenities and health: Examining the significance of a local park," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 99(C), pages 1-8.
    6. Woodgate, Roberta Lynn & Edwards, Marie & Ripat, Jacquie, 2012. "How families of children with complex care needs participate in everyday life," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 75(10), pages 1912-1920.
    7. repec:pal:palcom:v:4:y:2018:i:1:d:10.1057_s41599-017-0058-4 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. Liamputtong, Pranee & Suwankhong, Dusanee, 2015. "Therapeutic landscapes and living with breast cancer: The lived experiences of Thai women," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 128(C), pages 263-271.
    9. Muenchberger, Heidi & Ehrlich, Carolyn & Kendall, Elizabeth & Vit, Marina, 2012. "Experience of place for young adults under 65 years with complex disabilities moving into purpose-built residential care," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 75(12), pages 2151-2159.
    10. Martin, Graham P. & Nancarrow, Susan A. & Parker, Hilda & Phelps, Kay & Regen, Emma L., 2005. "Place, policy and practitioners: On rehabilitation, independence and the therapeutic landscape in the changing geography of care provision to older people in the UK," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 61(9), pages 1893-1904, November.
    11. repec:eee:socmed:v:197:y:2018:i:c:p:24-32 is not listed on IDEAS
    12. Milligan, Christine & Roberts, Celia & Mort, Maggie, 2011. "Telecare and older people: Who cares where?," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 72(3), pages 347-354, February.
    13. Völker, Sebastian & Kistemann, Thomas, 2013. "Reprint of: “I'm always entirely happy when I'm here!” Urban blue enhancing human health and well-being in Cologne and Düsseldorf, Germany," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 91(C), pages 141-152.
    14. repec:eee:socmed:v:202:y:2018:i:c:p:136-142 is not listed on IDEAS
    15. repec:eee:socmed:v:198:y:2018:i:c:p:77-84 is not listed on IDEAS
    16. Houghton, Frank & Houghton, Sharon, 2015. "Therapeutic micro-environments in the Edgelands: A thematic analysis of Richard Mabey's The Unofficial Countryside," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 133(C), pages 280-286.
    17. Donovan, Rhonda & Williams, Allison & Stajduhar, Kelli & Brazil, Kevin & Marshall, Denise, 2011. "The influence of culture on home-based family caregiving at end-of-life: A case study of Dutch reformed family care givers in Ontario, Canada," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 72(3), pages 338-346, February.
    18. Chakrabarti, Ranjana, 2010. "Therapeutic networks of pregnancy care: Bengali immigrant women in New York City," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 71(2), pages 362-369, July.
    19. Waitt, Gordon & Roggeveen, Kate & Gordon, Ross & Butler, Katherine & Cooper, Paul, 2016. "Tyrannies of thrift: Governmentality and older, low-income people’s energy efficiency narratives in the Illawarra, Australia," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 90(C), pages 37-45.
    20. repec:eee:cysrev:v:85:y:2018:i:c:p:99-106 is not listed on IDEAS

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