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More resources better health? A cross-national perspective

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  • Kim, Kwangkee
  • Moody, Philip M.

Abstract

This study is an attempt to examine the relative importance of health care resources in predicting infant mortality within industrialized, developing, and underdeveloped countries. The analyses were based on the data of 117 countries. Findings from this study suggest that health resources as a whole do not make a significant contribution to accounting for the variance of infant mortality rates over and above the variance accounted for by socioeconomic resources only. The contribution of health resources to the health of the population as a whole is really rather small in comparison to the role of socioeconomic resources.

Suggested Citation

  • Kim, Kwangkee & Moody, Philip M., 1992. "More resources better health? A cross-national perspective," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 34(8), pages 837-842, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:socmed:v:34:y:1992:i:8:p:837-842
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    Cited by:

    1. Roll, Kathrin, 2012. "The influence of regional health care structures on delay in diagnosis of rare diseases: The case of Marfan Syndrome," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 105(2), pages 119-127.
    2. Kaushal, Kaushalendra Kumar & F Ram, Faujdar Ram & Abhishek, Abhishek Singh, 2013. "Public Spending on Health and Childhood Mortality in India," MPRA Paper 48680, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Mansour Farahani & S. V. Subramanian & David Canning, 2010. "Effects of state-level public spending on health on the mortality probability in India," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 19(11), pages 1361-1376.
    4. repec:eee:socmed:v:194:y:2017:i:c:p:87-95 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Liebert, H. & Mäder, B., 2016. "Marginal effects of physician coverage on infant and disease mortality," Health, Econometrics and Data Group (HEDG) Working Papers 16/17, HEDG, c/o Department of Economics, University of York.
    6. AfDB AfDB, 2007. "Working Paper 91 - Health Expenditures and Health Outcomes in Africa," Working Paper Series 2304, African Development Bank.
    7. Malik, Sadia Mariam & Janjua, Yasin, 2010. "Geography, Institutions and Human Development: A Cross-Country Investigation Using Bayesian Model Averaging," MPRA Paper 24612, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    8. Liebert, Helge & Mäder, Beatrice, 2017. "The impact of regional health care coverage on infant mortality and disease incidence," Annual Conference 2017 (Vienna): Alternative Structures for Money and Banking 168103, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    9. Md. Emaj Uddin, 2017. "Family Demographic Mechanisms Linking of Socioeconomic Status to Subjective Physical Health in Rural Bangladesh," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 130(3), pages 1263-1279, February.
    10. Dov Chernichovsky & Arkady Bolotin & David Leeuw, 2003. "A fuzzy logic approach toward solving the analytic enigma of health system financing," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer;Deutsche Gesellschaft für Gesundheitsökonomie (DGGÖ), vol. 4(3), pages 158-175, September.
    11. ATAKE, Esso - Hanam, 2014. "Financement Public des dépenses de santé et survie infantile au Togo
      [Public funding of health expenditure and infant survival in Togo]
      ," MPRA Paper 59320, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 26 Oct 2014.
    12. Gebregziabher, Fiseha & Nino-Zarazua, Miguel, 2014. "Social spending and aggregate welfare in developing and transition economies," WIDER Working Paper Series 082, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    13. Dov Chernichovsky, 2001. "A Fuzzy Logic Approach Toward Solving the Analytic Maze of Health System Financing," NBER Working Papers 8470, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    14. Carolyn Moehling & Melissa Thomasson, 2014. "Saving Babies: The Impact of Public Education Programs on Infant Mortality," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 51(2), pages 367-386, April.
    15. Carolyn M. Moehling & Melissa A. Thomasson, 2012. "Saving Babies: The Contribution of Sheppard-Towner to the Decline in Infant Mortality in the 1920s," NBER Working Papers 17996, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    16. Marwa Farag & A. Nandakumar & Stanley Wallack & Dominic Hodgkin & Gary Gaumer & Can Erbil, 2013. "Health expenditures, health outcomes and the role of good governance," International Journal of Health Economics and Management, Springer, vol. 13(1), pages 33-52, March.
    17. Reibling, Nadine, 2013. "The international performance of healthcare systems in population health: Capabilities of pooled cross-sectional time series methods," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 112(1), pages 122-132.
    18. McGuire, James W., 2006. "Basic health care provision and under-5 mortality: A Cross-National study of developing Countries," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 34(3), pages 405-425, March.
    19. Liebert, Helge & Mäder, Beatrice, 2016. "The impact of regional health care coverage on infant mortality and disease incidence," Economics Working Paper Series 1620, University of St. Gallen, School of Economics and Political Science.
    20. AfDB AfDB, 2007. "Working Paper 91 - Health Expenditures and Health Outcomes in Africa," Working Paper Series 2224, African Development Bank.
    21. Audrey Verdier‐Chouchane & Karagueuzian Charlotte, 2016. "Working Paper 239 - Concept and measure of inclusive health across countries," Working Paper Series 2347, African Development Bank.
    22. Biswajit Maitra & C.K. Mukhopadhyay, 2012. "Public spending on education, health care and economic growth in selected countries of Asia and the Pacific," Asia-Pacific Development Journal, United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific (ESCAP), vol. 19(2), pages 19-48, December.
    23. Gupta, Sanjeev & Verhoeven, Marijn & Tiongson, Erwin R., 2002. "The effectiveness of government spending on education and health care in developing and transition economies," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 18(4), pages 717-737, November.
    24. Filmer, Deon & Pritchett, Lant, 1997. "Child mortality and public spending on health : how much does money matter?," Policy Research Working Paper Series 1864, The World Bank.

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