IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/eee/jfinec/v14y1985i3p473-489.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Dividend yields and stock returns: Implications of abnormal January returns

Author

Listed:
  • Keim, Donald B.

Abstract

This study examines the empirical relation between stock returns and (long-run) dividend yields. The findings show that much of the phenomenon is due to a non-linear relation between dividend yields and returns in January. Regression coefficients on dividend yields, which some models predict should be non-zero due to differential taxation of dividends and capital gains, exhibit a significant January seasonal, even when controlling for size. This finding is significant since there are no provisions in the after-tax asset pricing models that predict the tax differential is more important in January than in other months.
(This abstract was borrowed from another version of this item.)

Suggested Citation

  • Keim, Donald B., 1985. "Dividend yields and stock returns: Implications of abnormal January returns," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 14(3), pages 473-489, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jfinec:v:14:y:1985:i:3:p:473-489
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/0304-405X(85)90009-1
    Download Restriction: Full text for ScienceDirect subscribers only

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to look for a different version below or search for a different version of it.

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Mehra, Rajnish & Prescott, Edward C., 1985. "The equity premium: A puzzle," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 15(2), pages 145-161, March.
    2. Kenneth B. Dunn & Kenneth J. Singleton, 1984. "Modeling the Term Structure of Interest Rates Under Nonseparable Utilityand Duriability of Goods," NBER Working Papers 1415, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Hansen, Lars Peter & Singleton, Kenneth J, 1983. "Stochastic Consumption, Risk Aversion, and the Temporal Behavior of Asset Returns," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 91(2), pages 249-265, April.
    4. Hayne E. Leland, 1968. "Saving and Uncertainty: The Precautionary Demand for Saving," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 82(3), pages 465-473.
    5. Rubinstein, Mark, 1974. "An aggregation theorem for securities markets," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 1(3), pages 225-244, September.
    6. Grossman, Sanford J. & Shiller, Robert J., 1982. "Consumption correlatedness and risk measurement in economies with non-traded assets and heterogeneous information," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 10(2), pages 195-210, July.
    7. Kraus, Alan & Litzenberger, Robert H, 1976. "Skewness Preference and the Valuation of Risk Assets," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 31(4), pages 1085-1100, September.
    8. A. Sandmo, 1970. "The Effect of Uncertainty on Saving Decisions," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 37(3), pages 353-360.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Antje Henne & Sebastian Ostrowski & Peter Reichling, 2007. "Dividend Yield and Stability versus Performance at the German Stock Market," FEMM Working Papers 07017, Otto-von-Guericke University Magdeburg, Faculty of Economics and Management.
    2. Michael A. Goldstein & Abhinav Goyal & Brian M. Lucey & Cal B. Muckley, 2015. "The Global Preference for Dividends in Declining Markets," The Financial Review, Eastern Finance Association, vol. 50(4), pages 575-609, November.
    3. Clemens Sialm, 2009. "Tax Changes and Asset Pricing," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 99(4), pages 1356-1383, September.
    4. Lee, King Fuei, 2011. "Demographics and the Long-Horizon Returns of Dividend-Yield Strategies in the US," MPRA Paper 46350, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    5. Chung, Tin-fah & Ariff, M., 2016. "A test of the linkage among money supply, liquidity and share prices in Asia," Japan and the World Economy, Elsevier, vol. 39(C), pages 48-61.
    6. Safari, Meysam & TahmooresPour, Reza, 2011. "Moderation Effect of Market Condition on the Relationship between Dividend Yield and Stock Return," MPRA Paper 28913, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    7. Fazakas, Gergely & Juhász, Péter, 2009. "Alacsonyabb kockázat - nagyobb osztalék?. A részvénykockázat és az osztalékfizetési hányad kapcsolatának vizsgálata a Budapesti Értéktőzsdén (1997-2007)
      [Lower risks - higher dividends?. Examining
      ," Közgazdasági Szemle (Economic Review - monthly of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences), Közgazdasági Szemle Alapítvány (Economic Review Foundation), vol. 0(4), pages 322-342.
    8. Lee, King Fuei, 2010. "Retail minority shareholders and corporate reputation as determinant of dividend policy in Australia," Pacific-Basin Finance Journal, Elsevier, vol. 18(4), pages 351-368, September.
    9. De Moor, Lieven & Sercu, Piet, 2013. "The smallest firm effect: An international study," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 32(C), pages 129-155.
    10. Glosten, Lawrence R & Jagannathan, Ravi & Runkle, David E, 1993. " On the Relation between the Expected Value and the Volatility of the Nominal Excess Return on Stocks," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 48(5), pages 1779-1801, December.
    11. Fernandez, Pablo, 2004. "Are calculated betas good for anything?," IESE Research Papers D/555, IESE Business School.
    12. Wagner, Niklas & Winter, Elisabeth, 2013. "A new family of equity style indices and mutual fund performance: Do liquidity and idiosyncratic risk matter?," Journal of Empirical Finance, Elsevier, vol. 21(C), pages 69-85.
    13. Arnold L. Redman & Herman Manakyan & Kartono Liano, 1997. "Real Estate Investment Trusts and Calendar Anomalies," Journal of Real Estate Research, American Real Estate Society, vol. 14(1), pages 19-28.
    14. Kwon, Chung S. & Shin, Tai S., 1999. "Cointegration and causality between macroeconomic variables and stock market returns," Global Finance Journal, Elsevier, vol. 10(1), pages 71-81.
    15. Leonie Bell & Tim Jenkinson, 2002. "New Evidence of the Impact of Dividend Taxation and on the Identity of the Marginal Investor," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 57(3), pages 1321-1346, June.
    16. Greg Filbeck & Sue Visscher, 1997. "Dividend yield strategies in the British stock market," The European Journal of Finance, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 3(4), pages 277-289.
    17. Clare, A. D. & Smith, P. N. & Thomas, S. H., 1997. "UK stock returns and robust tests of mean variance efficiency," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 21(5), pages 641-660, May.
    18. Gregory Connor & Lisa R. Goldberg & Robert A. Korajczyk, 2010. "Portfolio Risk Analysis," Economics Books, Princeton University Press, edition 1, number 9224, June.
    19. Fuller, Kathleen P. & Goldstein, Michael A., 2011. "Do dividends matter more in declining markets?," Journal of Corporate Finance, Elsevier, vol. 17(3), pages 457-473, June.
    20. Yannick Malevergne & Pedro Santa-Clara & Didier Sornette, 2009. "Professor Zipf goes to Wall Street," NBER Working Papers 15295, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    21. Murphy, A. & Schlag, C., 1999. "An empirical examination of the effect of dividend taxation on asset pricing and returns in Germany," Global Finance Journal, Elsevier, vol. 10(1), pages 35-52.
    22. Morgan, Gareth & Thomas, Stephen, 1998. "Taxes, dividend yields and returns in the UK equity market," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 22(4), pages 405-423, May.
    23. Lee, King Fuei, 2013. "Demographics and the long-horizon returns of dividend-yield strategies," The Quarterly Review of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 53(2), pages 202-218.
    24. Kryzanowski, Lawrence & Switzer, Lorne & Jiang, Li, 1995. "Stock market crash behavior of screen-sorted portfolios," International Review of Economics & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 4(3), pages 227-244.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:eee:jfinec:v:14:y:1985:i:3:p:473-489. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Dana Niculescu). General contact details of provider: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/inca/505576 .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.