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Absenteeism and wages

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  • Weiss, Andrew

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Suggested Citation

  • Weiss, Andrew, 1985. "Absenteeism and wages," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 19(3), pages 277-279.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecolet:v:19:y:1985:i:3:p:277-279
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Broström, Göran & Palme, Mårten & Johansson, Per, 2002. "Economic incentives and gender differences in work absence behavior," Working Paper Series 2002:14, IFAU - Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy.
    2. Mohamed Ali Ben Halima & Thierry Debrand & Camille Regaert, 2012. "Sick Leaves: Understanding Disparities Between French Departments," Working Papers DT50, IRDES institut for research and information in health economics, revised Oct 2012.
    3. Heywood, John S. & Jirjahn, Uwe & Wei, Xiangdong, 2008. "Teamwork, monitoring and absence," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 68(3-4), pages 676-690, December.
    4. Boris HirschBy & Daniel S. J. Lechmann & Claus Schnabel, 2017. "Coming to work while sick: an economic theory of presenteeism with an application to German data," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 69(4), pages 1010-1031.
    5. de Luna, Xavier & Johansson, Per, 2001. "Testing exogeneity under distributional misspecification," Working Paper Series 2001:9, IFAU - Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy.
    6. repec:wfo:wstudy:59178 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Mohamed Ali Ben Halima & Thierry Debrand & Camille Regaert, 2011. "Arrêts maladie : comprendre les disparités départementales," Working Papers DT39, IRDES institut for research and information in health economics, revised Feb 2011.
    8. Barmby, Tim, 2002. "Worker absenteeism: a discrete hazard model with bivariate heterogeneity," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 9(4), pages 469-476, September.
    9. Melvyn Coles & Joseph Lanfranchi & Ali Skalli & John Treble, 2007. "Pay, Technology, And The Cost Of Worker Absence," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 45(2), pages 268-285, April.
    10. Fumio Ohtake, 2003. "Unions, the Costs of Job Loss, and Vacation," NBER Chapters,in: Labor Markets and Firm Benefit Policies in Japan and the United States, pages 371-390 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    11. repec:wfo:wstudy:50887 is not listed on IDEAS
    12. repec:wfo:wstudy:47123 is not listed on IDEAS
    13. René Böheim & Thomas Leoni, 2014. "Firms' Sickness Costs and Workers' Sickness Absences," NBER Working Papers 20305, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    14. Coles, Melvyn G. & Treble, John G., 1996. "Calculating the price of worker reliability," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 3(2), pages 169-188, September.
    15. repec:wfo:wstudy:58508 is not listed on IDEAS
    16. Carlo Alberto Biscardo & Alessandro Bucciol & Paolo Pertile, 2015. "Who should monitor job sick leave?," Working Papers 18/2015, University of Verona, Department of Economics.
    17. Markussen, Simen, 2009. "The Effects of Sick-Leaves on Earnings," Memorandum 20/2009, Oslo University, Department of Economics.
    18. Roger Klein & Richard H. Spady & Andrew Weiss, 1987. "Factors Affecting the Output and Quit Propensities of Production Workers," NBER Working Papers 2184, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    19. Audas, Rick & Goddard, John, 2001. "Absenteeism, seasonality, and the business cycle," Journal of Economics and Business, Elsevier, vol. 53(4), pages 405-419.
    20. repec:wfo:wstudy:60730 is not listed on IDEAS
    21. D.S. Possenriede & W.H.J. Hassink & J. Plantenga, 2014. "Does temporal and locational flexibility of work reduce absenteeism?," Working Papers 14-09, Utrecht School of Economics.
    22. Skatun, John Douglas, 2003. "Take some days off, why don't you?: Endogenous sick leave and pay," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 22(3), pages 379-402, May.
    23. Hensvik, Lena & Rosenqvist, Olof, 2015. "The strength of the weakest link: sickness absence, internal substitutability and worker-firm matching," Working Paper Series 2015:28, IFAU - Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy.

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