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Methods for estimating the population contribution to environmental change

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  • Raskin, Paul D.

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  • Raskin, Paul D., 1995. "Methods for estimating the population contribution to environmental change," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 15(3), pages 225-233, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecolec:v:15:y:1995:i:3:p:225-233
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Malthus, Thomas Robert, 1798. "An Essay on the Principle of Population," History of Economic Thought Books, McMaster University Archive for the History of Economic Thought, number malthus1798.
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    Cited by:

    1. Yu Liu & Hongwei Xiao & Precious Zikhali & Yingkang Lv, 2014. "Carbon Emissions in China: A Spatial Econometric Analysis at the Regional Level," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 6(9), pages 1-19, September.
    2. Shi, Anqing, 2003. "The impact of population pressure on global carbon dioxide emissions, 1975-1996: evidence from pooled cross-country data," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 44(1), pages 29-42, February.
    3. Wang, Shaojian & Fang, Chuanglin & Wang, Yang, 2016. "Spatiotemporal variations of energy-related CO2 emissions in China and its influencing factors: An empirical analysis based on provincial panel data," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 55(C), pages 505-515.
    4. York, Richard & Rosa, Eugene A. & Dietz, Thomas, 2003. "STIRPAT, IPAT and ImPACT: analytic tools for unpacking the driving forces of environmental impacts," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 46(3), pages 351-365, October.
    5. Rothman, Dale S., 1998. "Environmental Kuznets curves--real progress or passing the buck?: A case for consumption-based approaches," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 25(2), pages 177-194, May.
    6. Puliafito, Salvador Enrique & Puliafito, José Luis & Grand, Mariana Conte, 2008. "Modeling population dynamics and economic growth as competing species: An application to CO2 global emissions," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 65(3), pages 602-615, April.
    7. Yu Liu & Hongwei Xiao & Ning Zhang, 2016. "Industrial Carbon Emissions of China’s Regions: A Spatial Econometric Analysis," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 8(3), pages 1-14, February.
    8. repec:gam:jsusta:v:8:y:2016:i:3:p:210:d:64706 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Klaus Hubacek & Kuishuang Feng & Bin Chen, 2011. "Changing Lifestyles Towards a Low Carbon Economy: An IPAT Analysis for China," Energies, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 5(1), pages 1-10, December.
    10. Raghbendra Jha & K.V. Bhanu Murthy, 2004. "A Consumption Based Human Development Index and The Global Environmental Kuznets Curve," ASARC Working Papers 2004-01, The Australian National University, Australia South Asia Research Centre.
    11. M. Kissinger & Y. Karplus, 2015. "IPAT and the analysis of local human–environment impact processes: the case of indigenous Bedouin towns in Israel," Environment, Development and Sustainability: A Multidisciplinary Approach to the Theory and Practice of Sustainable Development, Springer, vol. 17(1), pages 101-121, February.
    12. Oskar Gans & Frank Jöst, 2005. "Decomposing the impact of population growth on environmental deterioration: some critical comments on a widespread method in ecological economics," Working Papers 0422, University of Heidelberg, Department of Economics, revised Sep 2005.
    13. repec:gam:jsusta:v:7:y:2015:i:12:p:16670-16686:d:60775 is not listed on IDEAS
    14. repec:eee:eneeco:v:66:y:2017:i:c:p:360-371 is not listed on IDEAS
    15. repec:gam:jsusta:v:10:y:2018:i:3:p:644-:d:133973 is not listed on IDEAS
    16. Yuanyuan Gong & Deyong Song, 2015. "Life Cycle Building Carbon Emissions Assessment and Driving Factors Decomposition Analysis Based on LMDI—A Case Study of Wuhan City in China," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 7(12), pages 1-17, December.
    17. Feng, Kuishuang & Hubacek, Klaus & Guan, Dabo, 2009. "Lifestyles, technology and CO2 emissions in China: A regional comparative analysis," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 69(1), pages 145-154, November.
    18. Shafiei, Sahar & Salim, Ruhul A., 2014. "Non-renewable and renewable energy consumption and CO2 emissions in OECD countries: A comparative analysis," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 66(C), pages 547-556.
    19. repec:lrk:eeaart:35_3_9 is not listed on IDEAS

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