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Vote‐Buying and Reciprocity

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  • Frederico Finan
  • Laura Schechter

Abstract

In this paper, how social preferences overcome the commitment problems implicit in vote-buying is examined. Data used for the study is a survey information on vote-buying experienced in a 2006 municipal election in Paraguay, with information on behavior in experiments carried out in 2002. [Working Paper No. 214].
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Suggested Citation

  • Frederico Finan & Laura Schechter, 2012. "Vote‐Buying and Reciprocity," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 80(2), pages 863-881, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:ecm:emetrp:v:80:y:2012:i:2:p:863-881
    DOI: ECTA9035
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    JEL classification:

    • H23 - Public Economics - - Taxation, Subsidies, and Revenue - - - Externalities; Redistributive Effects; Environmental Taxes and Subsidies
    • H41 - Public Economics - - Publicly Provided Goods - - - Public Goods
    • O1 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development

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