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Advantageous Effects of Regulatory Adverse Selection in the Life Insurance Market

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  • Mattias K. Polborn
  • Michael Hoy
  • Asha Sadanand

Abstract

We analyse the effects of regulations prohibiting the use of information to risk-rate premiums in a life insurance market. New information derived from genetic tests is likely to become increasingly relevant in the future. Many governments prohibit the use of this information, thereby generating 'regulatory adverse selection'. In our model, individuals early in their lives know neither their desired level of life insurance later in life nor their mortality risk, but learn both over time. We obtain both positive and normative results that differ qualitatively from those in standard, static models. Legislation prohibiting the use of genetic tests for ratemaking may increase welfare. Copyright 2006 Royal Economic Society.

Suggested Citation

  • Mattias K. Polborn & Michael Hoy & Asha Sadanand, 2006. "Advantageous Effects of Regulatory Adverse Selection in the Life Insurance Market," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 116(508), pages 327-354, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:ecj:econjl:v:116:y:2006:i:508:p:327-354
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    Cited by:

    1. Choi Yun Jeong & Chen Joe & Sawada Yasuyuki, 2015. "Life Insurance and Suicide: Asymmetric Information Revisited," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 15(3), pages 1127-1149, July.
    2. R. Guy Thomas, 2008. "Loss Coverage as a Public Policy Objective for Risk Classification Schemes," Journal of Risk & Insurance, The American Risk and Insurance Association, vol. 75(4), pages 997-1018.
    3. Renaud Bourlès, 2017. "Prevention incentives in long-term insurance contracts," Journal of Economics & Management Strategy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 26(3), pages 661-674, September.
    4. Vijay Aseervatham & Christoph Lex & Spindler, Martin, 2014. "How do unisex rating regulations affect gender differences in insurance premiums?," MEA discussion paper series 201416, Munich Center for the Economics of Aging (MEA) at the Max Planck Institute for Social Law and Social Policy.
    5. Wenan Fei & Claude Fluet & Harris Schlesinger, 2015. "Uncertain Bequest Needs and Long-Term Insurance Contracts," Journal of Risk & Insurance, The American Risk and Insurance Association, vol. 82(1), pages 125-148, March.
    6. Georges Dionne & Casey Rothschild, 2014. "Economic Effects of Risk Classification Bans," The Geneva Risk and Insurance Review, Palgrave Macmillan;International Association for the Study of Insurance Economics (The Geneva Association), vol. 39(2), pages 184-221, September.
    7. Nan Zhu & Daniel Bauer, 2013. "Coherent Pricing of Life Settlements Under Asymmetric Information," Journal of Risk & Insurance, The American Risk and Insurance Association, vol. 80(3), pages 827-851, September.
    8. Edmond Baranes & David Bardey, 2015. "Competition between health maintenance organizations and nonintegrated health insurance companies in health insurance markets," Health Economics Review, Springer, vol. 5(1), pages 1-9, December.
    9. Eric Stephens & James R. Thompson, 2015. "Separation Without Exclusion in Financial Insurance," Journal of Risk & Insurance, The American Risk and Insurance Association, vol. 82(4), pages 853-864, December.
    10. Angus Macdonald & Pradip Tapadar, 2010. "Multifactorial Genetic Disorders and Adverse Selection: Epidemiology Meets Economics," Journal of Risk & Insurance, The American Risk and Insurance Association, vol. 77(1), pages 155-182.
    11. Georges Dionne & Nathalie Fombaron & Neil Doherty, 2012. "Adverse Selection in Insurance Contracting," Cahiers de recherche 1231, CIRPEE.
    12. Finkelstein, Amy & Poterba, James & Rothschild, Casey, 2009. "Redistribution by insurance market regulation: Analyzing a ban on gender-based retirement annuities," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 91(1), pages 38-58, January.
    13. Koch, Thomas G., 2014. "One pool to insure them all? Age, risk and the price(s) of medical insurance," International Journal of Industrial Organization, Elsevier, vol. 35(C), pages 1-11.
    14. Vicky Barham & Rose Anne Devlin & Olga Milliken, 2016. "Genetic Health Risks: The Case for Universal Public Health Insurance," Working Papers 1605E, University of Ottawa, Department of Economics.
    15. repec:pra:mprapa:55343 is not listed on IDEAS
    16. repec:eee:jhecon:v:55:y:2017:i:c:p:95-107 is not listed on IDEAS
    17. Kesternich, Iris & Schumacher, Heiner, 2009. "On the Use of Information in Repeated Insurance Markets," Discussion Paper Series of SFB/TR 15 Governance and the Efficiency of Economic Systems 280, Free University of Berlin, Humboldt University of Berlin, University of Bonn, University of Mannheim, University of Munich.
    18. Michael Hoy & Michael Ruse, 2008. "“No Solution to This Dilemma Exists”: Discrimination, Insurance, and the Human Genome Project," Working Papers 0808, University of Guelph, Department of Economics and Finance.

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