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The Impact of Extreme Weather Events on Children’s Height: Evidence from Mongolia

Author

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  • Valeria Groppo
  • Kati Krähnert

Abstract

Shocks experienced during early childhood can harm the long term growth of children. We examine the potential impact of extreme weather events on children’s height,taking the example of Mongolia, which is frequently plagued by extreme winters. Our focus is on the unusually harsh winter of 2009/10, which caused the deaths of over 10 million animals, approximately 23.9 percent of the country’s entire stock. We identify causal effects by exploiting exogenous variation in the intensity of the shock across time and space. We find that the extreme winter of 2009/10 considerably impaired the growth of exposed children from herding households. Exposed children are small for their age, even three years after the event. It can be expected that the cohorts of exposed children will be smaller, poorer, and less healthy, even as adults.

Suggested Citation

  • Valeria Groppo & Kati Krähnert, 2014. "The Impact of Extreme Weather Events on Children’s Height: Evidence from Mongolia," DIW Economic Bulletin, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research, vol. 4(12), pages 3-9.
  • Handle: RePEc:diw:diwdeb:2014-12-1
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    File URL: http://www.diw.de/documents/publikationen/73/diw_01.c.498094.de/diw_econ_bull_2014-12-1.pdf
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Allison Hahn, 2018. "Complexity of Mongolian stakeholders’ dzud preparation and response," Natural Hazards: Journal of the International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, Springer;International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, vol. 92(1), pages 127-143, November.
    2. Lijuan Miao & Richard Fraser & Zhanli Sun & David Sneath & Bin He & Xuefeng Cui, 2016. "Climate impact on vegetation and animal husbandry on the Mongolian plateau: a comparative analysis," Natural Hazards: Journal of the International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, Springer;International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, vol. 80(2), pages 727-739, January.
    3. Veronika Bertram-Huemmer & Kati Kraehnert, 2018. "Does Index Insurance Help Households Recover from Disaster? Evidence from IBLI Mongolia," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 100(1), pages 145-171.
    4. Lijuan Miao & Richard Fraser & Zhanli Sun & David Sneath & Bin He & Xuefeng Cui, 2016. "Climate impact on vegetation and animal husbandry on the Mongolian plateau: a comparative analysis," Natural Hazards: Journal of the International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, Springer;International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, vol. 80(2), pages 727-739, January.
    5. Francesco Pastore, 2016. "‘I Wish I Had 100 Dollars a Month …’ The Determinants of Poverty in Mongolia," The European Journal of Development Research, Palgrave Macmillan;European Association of Development Research and Training Institutes (EADI), vol. 28(5), pages 934-956, November.
    6. Elsa Valli, 2017. "Essays on social protection," Economics PhD Theses 1017, Department of Economics, University of Sussex Business School.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    anthropometrics; children; health; Mongolia; weather shocks;

    JEL classification:

    • I15 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health and Economic Development
    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth
    • O12 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Microeconomic Analyses of Economic Development

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