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US regional and national cause-specific mortality and trends in income inequality: descriptive findings

Author

Listed:
  • FFF1John NNN1Lynch

    (University of Michigan)

  • FFF2George NNN2Davey Smith

    (University of Bristol)

  • FFF2Jim NNN2Dunn

    (St. Michael's Hospital)

  • FFF2Sam NNN2Harper

    (University of Michigan)

  • FFF2Nancy NNN2Ross

    (McGill University)

  • FFF2Michael NNN2Wolfson

    (University of Ottawa)

Abstract

We examined the concordance of income inequality trends with 30-year US regional trends in cause-specific mortality and 100-year trends in heart disease and infant mortality. The evidence suggests that any effects of income inequality on population health trends cannot be reduced to simple processes that operate across all contexts and in all time periods. If income inequality does indeed drive population health, it implies that income inequality would have to be linked and de-linked across different time periods, with different exposures to generate the observed heterogeneous trends and levels in the causes of mortality shown here.

Suggested Citation

  • FFF1John NNN1Lynch & FFF2George NNN2Davey Smith & FFF2Jim NNN2Dunn & FFF2Sam NNN2Harper & FFF2Nancy NNN2Ross & FFF2Michael NNN2Wolfson, 2004. "US regional and national cause-specific mortality and trends in income inequality: descriptive findings," Demographic Research Special Collections, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 2(8), pages 183-228, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:dem:drspec:v:2:y:2004:i:8
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Vladimir Shkolnikov & Evgeny Andreev & Zhen Zhang & James Oeppen & James Vaupel, 2011. "Losses of Expected Lifetime in the United States and Other Developed Countries: Methods and Empirical Analyses," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 48(1), pages 211-239, February.
    2. Richard H. Steckel & Garrett Senney, 2015. "Historical Origins of a Major Killer: Cardiovascular Disease in the American South," NBER Working Papers 21809, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Richard H. Steckel & Garrett T. Senney, 2015. "Developmental Origins of Cardiovascular Disease: Understanding High Mortality Rates in the American South," Working Papers 15-01, Ohio State University, Department of Economics.
    4. Vladimir M. Shkolnikov & Evgueni M. Andreev & Zhen Zhang & James E. Oeppen & James W. Vaupel, 2009. "Losses of expected lifetime in the US and other developed countries: methods and empirical analyses," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2009-042, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    cause-specific mortality; income; income inequality; mortality; population health; trends; United States;

    JEL classification:

    • J1 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics
    • Z0 - Other Special Topics - - General

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