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Women's sexual control within conjugal union


  • Peter Olasupo Ogunjuyigbe

    (Obafemi Awolowo University)

  • Gbenga Adeyemi

    (Lagos State University)


This study attempts to examine the extent to which women have control over their sexuality within marriage and its implication for the spread of HIV/AIDS. The survey was carried out in metropolitan Lagos. The study shows that women have some control over their sexuality especially during certain occasions such as during menstruation, breastfeeding, pregnancy and when they are sick. However, only few women could negotiate with their husbands especially by insisting on safe sexual practices. The study therefore shows that women need to be educated on the need for safer sex practices, especially in this era of HIV/AIDS. They should also be economically empowered so as to practice safer sex. Again, men should be educated on the safer sex practices in other to control the spread of HIV/AIDS.

Suggested Citation

  • Peter Olasupo Ogunjuyigbe & Gbenga Adeyemi, 2005. "Women's sexual control within conjugal union," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 12(2), pages 29-50, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:dem:demres:v:12:y:2005:i:2

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item


    extramarital; marriage; menstruation; safe sex; sex behavior; sexuality;

    JEL classification:

    • J1 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics
    • Z0 - Other Special Topics - - General


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