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Education at home: the age-specific pattern of migration between the Netherlands and the former Dutch East Indies around 1930


  • Evert van Imhoff

    (Nederlands Interdisciplinair Demografisch Instituut (NIDI))

  • Gijs Beets

    (Nederlands Interdisciplinair Demografisch Instituut (NIDI))


The 1930 population census of the former Dutch East Indies (currently Indonesia) shows for the European population a striking shortage in the age range 10-20. This paper deals with the possible causes of this constriction in the age structure, in particular, the phenomenon of European children attending secondary education in the Netherlands. Using sample data from the city of The Hague, it is estimated that the proportion of students in the Netherlands born in the Dutch Indies was about 3 per cent, implying than the teenager gap in the Dutch Indies was for about half due to a cohort effect and for the other half due to the ‘education at home’ effect.

Suggested Citation

  • Evert van Imhoff & Gijs Beets, 2004. "Education at home: the age-specific pattern of migration between the Netherlands and the former Dutch East Indies around 1930," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 11(12), pages 335-356, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:dem:demres:v:11:y:2004:i:12

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Keilman,N., 2000. "Demographic translation : from period to cohort perspective and back," Memorandum 06/2000, Oslo University, Department of Economics.
    2. Ron Lesthaeghe & Paul Willems, 1999. "Is Low Fertility a Temporary Phenomenon in the European Union?," Population and Development Review, The Population Council, Inc., vol. 25(2), pages 211-228.
    3. Hans-Peter Kohler & Dimiter Philipov, 2001. "Variance effects in the bongaarts-feeney formula," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 38(1), pages 1-16, February.
    4. Hans-Peter Kohler & José A. Ortega, 2001. "Period parity progression measures with continued fertility postponement: a new look at the implications of delayed childbearing for cohort fertility," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2001-001, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
    5. N. Ryder, 1964. "The process of demographic translation," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 1(1), pages 74-82, March.
    6. Evert Imhoff & Nico Keilman, 2000. "On the Quantum and Tempo of Fertility: Comment," Population and Development Review, The Population Council, Inc., vol. 26(3), pages 549-553.
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    Cited by:

    1. Shahin Yaqub, 2009. "Independent Child Migrants in Developing Countries: Unexplored links in migration and development," Papers inwopa09/62, Innocenti Working Papers.
    2. Eric Edmonds & Maheshwor Shrestha, 2009. "Children's Work and Independent Child Migration: A critical review," Papers inwopa586, Innocenti Working Papers.

    More about this item


    age structure; aging; census; colonization; Dutch East Indies; education; Europe; Europeans; Indonesia; migration; secondary education;

    JEL classification:

    • J1 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics
    • Z0 - Other Special Topics - - General


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