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The naturalness of (many) social institutions: evolved cognition as their foundation

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  • BOYER, PASCAL
  • PETERSEN, MICHAEL BANG

Abstract

Most standard social science accounts only offer limited explanations of institutional design, i.e. why institutions have common features observed in many different human groups. Here we suggest that these features are best explained as the outcome of evolved human cognition, in such domains as mating, moral judgment and social exchange. As empirical illustrations, we show how this evolved psychology makes marriage systems, legal norms and commons management systems intuitively obvious and compelling, thereby ensuring their occurrence and cultural stability. We extend this to propose under what conditions institutions can become ‘natural’, compelling and legitimate, and outline probable paths for institutional change given human cognitive dispositions. Explaining institutions in terms of these exogenous factors also suggests that a general theory of institutions as such is neither necessary nor in fact possible. What are required are domain-specific accounts of institutional design in different domains of evolved cognition.

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  • Boyer, Pascal & Petersen, Michael Bang, 2012. "The naturalness of (many) social institutions: evolved cognition as their foundation," Journal of Institutional Economics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 8(01), pages 1-25, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:cup:jinsec:v:8:y:2012:i:01:p:1-25_00
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    1. repec:ers:journl:v:xx:y:2017:i:3a:p:370-385 is not listed on IDEAS
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