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The Role of Private Property in the Nazi Economy: The Case of Industry

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  • BUCHHEIM, CHRISTOPH
  • SCHERNER, JONAS

Abstract

Private property in the industry of the Third Reich is often considered a mere nominal provision without much substance. However, that is not correct, because firms, despite the rationing and licensing activities of the state, still had ample scope to devise their own production and investment profiles. Even regarding war-related projects, freedom of contract was generally respected; instead of using power, the state offered firms a number of contract options to choose from. There were several motives behind this attitude of the regime, among them the conviction that private property provided important incentives for increasing efficiency.

Suggested Citation

  • Buchheim, Christoph & Scherner, Jonas, 2006. "The Role of Private Property in the Nazi Economy: The Case of Industry," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 66(2), pages 390-416, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:cup:jechis:v:66:y:2006:i:02:p:390-416_00
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    Blog mentions

    As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
    1. Nazi political economy
      by pseudoerasmus in Pseudoerasmus on 2015-05-06 06:00:27
    2. Fascism was not left-wing !!!
      by pseudoerasmus in Pseudoerasmus on 2015-05-03 22:53:33

    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Fernando Mendiola, 2014. "Of Firms and Captives: Railway Infrastructures and the Economics of Forced Labour (Spain, 1937 – 1957)," Documentos de Trabajo (DT-AEHE) 1405, Asociación Española de Historia Económica.
    2. Harrison, Mark, 2011. "Capitalism at War," CAGE Online Working Paper Series 60, Competitive Advantage in the Global Economy (CAGE).
    3. Germà Bel, 2010. "Against the mainstream: Nazi privatization in 1930s Germany1," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 63(1), pages 34-55, February.
    4. Jochen Streb, 2009. "Negotiating contract types and contract clauses in the German construction industry during the Third Reich," RAND Journal of Economics, RAND Corporation, vol. 40(2), pages 364-379, June.
    5. Sebastian A.J. Keibek, 2016. "Using probate data to determine historical male occupational structures," Working Papers 26, Department of Economic and Social History at the University of Cambridge, revised 21 Mar 2017.
    6. Barry Eichengreen & Albrecht Ritschl, 2009. "Understanding West German economic growth in the 1950s," Cliometrica, Journal of Historical Economics and Econometric History, Association Française de Cliométrie (AFC), vol. 3(3), pages 191-219, October.
    7. Lutz Budrass & Jonas Scherner & Jochen Streb, 2010. "Fixed‐price contracts, learning, and outsourcing: explaining the continuous growth of output and labour productivity in the German aircraft industry during the Second World War1," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 63(1), pages 107-136, February.
    8. David Chambers & Carsten Burhop & Brian Cheffins, 2016. "The Rise and Fall of the German Stock Market, 1870-1938," Working Papers 25, Department of Economic and Social History at the University of Cambridge, revised 21 Sep 2016.

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