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Constitutions, Corporations, and Corruption: American States and Constitutional Change, 1842 to 1852

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  • Wallis, John Joseph

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  • Wallis, John Joseph, 2005. "Constitutions, Corporations, and Corruption: American States and Constitutional Change, 1842 to 1852," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 65(01), pages 211-256, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:cup:jechis:v:65:y:2005:i:01:p:211-256_05
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    Cited by:

    1. Canuto, Otaviano & Liu, Lili, 2013. "Subnational Debt, Insolvency, and Market Development," World Bank - Economic Premise, The World Bank, issue 112, pages 1-7, April.
    2. Naomi R. Lamoreaux, 2014. "Revisiting American Exceptionalism: Democracy and the Regulation of Corporate Governance: The Case of Nineteenth-Century Pennsylvania in Comparative Context," NBER Chapters,in: Enterprising America: Businesses, Banks, and Credit Markets in Historical Perspective, pages 25-71 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Eric Hilt, 2016. "Corporation Law and the Shift toward Open Access in the Antebellum United States," NBER Chapters,in: Organizations, Civil Society, and the Roots of Development, pages 147-177 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Qian Lu & John Joseph Wallis, 2015. "Banks, Politics, and Political Parties: From Partisan Banking to Open Access in Early Massachusetts," NBER Working Papers 21572, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Qian Lu & John Joseph Wallis, 2017. "Banks, Politics, and Political Parties: From Partisan Banking to Open Access in Early Massachusetts," NBER Chapters,in: Organizations, Civil Society, and the Roots of Development, pages 109-145 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. C. Randall HENNING & Martin KESSLER, 2012. "Fiscal Federalism: US History for Architects of Europe’s Fiscal Union," Economic Policy, Russian Presidential Academy of National Economy and Public Administration, vol. 6, pages 1-31.
    7. Aizenman, Joshua, 2012. "The Euro and the global crises: finding the balance between short term stabilization and forward looking reforms," Santa Cruz Department of Economics, Working Paper Series qt8mc1z1wc, Department of Economics, UC Santa Cruz.
    8. Jeffrey Rogers Hummel, 2012. "Some Possible Consequences of a U.S. Government Default," Econ Journal Watch, Econ Journal Watch, vol. 9(1), pages 24-40, January.
    9. Naomi R. Lamoreaux & Jean-Laurent Rosenthal, 2006. "Corporate Governance and the Plight of Minority Shareholders in the United States before the Great Depression," NBER Chapters,in: Corruption and Reform: Lessons from America's Economic History, pages 125-152 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    10. John A. Dove, 2017. "Property Tax Limits, Balanced Budget Rules, and Line-Item Vetoes: A Long-Run View," Eastern Economic Journal, Palgrave Macmillan;Eastern Economic Association, vol. 43(2), pages 288-317, March.
    11. Vollrath, Dietrich, 2013. "Inequality and school funding in the rural United States, 1890," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 50(2), pages 267-284.
    12. Heiko T. Burret & Lars P. Feld, 2014. "A Note on Budget Rules and Fiscal Federalism," ifo DICE Report, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich, vol. 12(1), pages 03-11, 04.
    13. Joshua Aizenman & Gunnar Gunnarsson, 2015. "Fiscal Challenges in Multilayered Unions: An Overview and Case Study," Social Sciences, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 4(2), pages 1-20, May.
    14. John Dove, 2012. "Credible commitments and constitutional constraints: state debt repudiation and default in nineteenth century America," Constitutional Political Economy, Springer, vol. 23(1), pages 66-93, March.
    15. John Wallis, 2015. "Rules, Organizations, and Governments," Atlantic Economic Journal, Springer;International Atlantic Economic Society, vol. 43(1), pages 69-86, March.
    16. repec:ces:ifodic:v:12:y:2014:i:1:p:19108838 is not listed on IDEAS
    17. Wallis, John Joseph, 2011. "Institutions, organizations, impersonality, and interests: The dynamics of institutions," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 79(1-2), pages 48-64, June.

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