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International Institutions and Socialization in Europe: Introduction and Framework

  • Checkel, Jeffrey T.
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    International institutions are a ubiquitous feature of daily life in many world regions, and nowhere more so than contemporary Europe. While virtually all would agree that such institutions matter, there is less agreement on exactly how they have effects. This special issue brings together European Union specialists and international relations theorists who address the latter issue. In particular, we explore the socializing role of institutions in Europe, with our central concern being to better specify the mechanisms of socialization and the conditions under which they are expected to lead to the internalization of new roles or interests. Drawing on a multifaceted understanding of human rationality, we consider three generic social mechanisms strategic calculation, role playing, and normative suasion and their ability to promote socialization outcomes within international institutions. This disaggregation exercise not only helps consolidate nascent socialization research programs in international relations theory and EU studies; it also highlights points of contact and potential synergies between rationalism and social constructivism.For comments on earlier versions, I am grateful to two anonymous referees, IO editors Lisa Martin and Thomas Risse, as well as to John Duffield, Alexandra Gheciu, Liesbet Hooghe, Peter Katzenstein, Ron Mitchell, Frank Schimmelfennig, Martha Snodgrass, and Michael Z rn. More generally, thanks are owed to all the project participants for numerous and valuable discussions on the themes addressed in this volume.

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    Article provided by Cambridge University Press in its journal International Organization.

    Volume (Year): 59 (2005)
    Issue (Month): 04 (October)
    Pages: 801-826

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    Handle: RePEc:cup:intorg:v:59:y:2005:i:04:p:801-826_05
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