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Regime design matters: intentional oil pollution and treaty compliance

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  • Mitchell, Ronald B.

Abstract

Whether a treaty elicits compliance from governments or nonstate actors depends upon identifiable characteristics of the regime's compliance systems. Within the international regime controlling intentional oil pollution, a provision requiring tanker owners to install specified equipment produced dramatically higher levels of compliance than a provision requiring tanker operators to limit their discharges. Since both provisions entailed strong economic incentives for violation and regulated the same countries over the same time period, the variance in compliance clearly can be attributed to different features of the two subregimes. The equipment requirements' success stemmed from establishing an integrated compliance system that increased transparency, provided for potent and credible sanctions, reduced implementation costs to governments by building on existing infrastructures, and prevented violations rather than merely deterring them.

Suggested Citation

  • Mitchell, Ronald B., 1994. "Regime design matters: intentional oil pollution and treaty compliance," International Organization, Cambridge University Press, vol. 48(03), pages 425-458, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:cup:intorg:v:48:y:1994:i:03:p:425-458_02
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    Cited by:

    1. Christopher Pallas & Johannes Urpelainen, 2012. "NGO monitoring and the legitimacy of international cooperation: A strategic analysis," The Review of International Organizations, Springer, vol. 7(1), pages 1-32, March.
    2. Knapp, Sabine & Franses, Philip Hans, 2009. "Does ratification matter and do major conventions improve safety and decrease pollution in shipping?," Marine Policy, Elsevier, vol. 33(5), pages 826-846, September.
    3. Scott Barrett & Astrid Dannenberg, 2017. "Tipping Versus Cooperating to Supply a Public Good," Journal of the European Economic Association, European Economic Association, vol. 15(4), pages 910-941.
    4. Knudsen, Olav F., 2010. "Transport interests and environmental regimes: The Baltic Sea transit of Russian oil exports," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 38(1), pages 151-160, January.
    5. Johannes Urpelainen, 2011. "Early birds: Special interests and the strategic logic of international cooperation," The Review of International Organizations, Springer, vol. 6(2), pages 113-140, July.
    6. Sarah Al Doyaili & Leo Wangler, 2013. "International climate policy: does it matter? An empirical assessment," Journal of Environmental Economics and Policy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 2(3), pages 288-302, November.
    7. Blome, Kerstin, 2011. "Wie erfolgversprechend ist die Reproduktion institutionellen Designs? Individualbeschwerden im Kontext des Inter-Amerikanischen Menschenrechtssystems sowie des juristischen Systems der Andengemeinscha," TranState Working Papers 144, University of Bremen, Collaborative Research Center 597: Transformations of the State.
    8. Checkel, Jeffrey T., 2014. "Mechanisms, process and the study of international institutions," Discussion Papers, Research Unit: Global Governance SP IV 2014-104, Social Science Research Center Berlin (WZB).
    9. Thomas Bernauer & Anna Kalbhenn & Vally Koubi & Gabriele Spilker, 2013. "Is there a “Depth versus Participation” dilemma in international cooperation?," The Review of International Organizations, Springer, vol. 8(4), pages 477-497, December.
    10. repec:spr:revint:v:12:y:2017:i:3:d:10.1007_s11558-016-9260-1 is not listed on IDEAS
    11. Zhang, Zhong Xiang, 1999. "International greenhouse gas emissions trading: who should be held liable for the non-compliance by sellers?," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 31(3), pages 323-329, December.
    12. Christopher Marcoux & Johannes Urpelainen, 2013. "Non-compliance by design: Moribund hard law in international institutions," The Review of International Organizations, Springer, vol. 8(2), pages 163-191, June.
    13. Zhang, ZhongXiang, 1999. "The design and implementation of an international greenhouse gas emissions trading scheme," MPRA Paper 13046, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    14. Todd Allee & Manfred Elsig, 2016. "Why do some international institutions contain strong dispute settlement provisions? New evidence from preferential trade agreements," The Review of International Organizations, Springer, vol. 11(1), pages 89-120, March.
    15. Jasper Krommendijk, 2015. "The domestic effectiveness of international human rights monitoring in established democracies. The case of the UN human rights treaty bodies," The Review of International Organizations, Springer, vol. 10(4), pages 489-512, December.
    16. Johannes Urpelainen, 2010. "Enforcing international environmental cooperation: Technological standards can help," The Review of International Organizations, Springer, vol. 5(4), pages 475-496, December.
    17. Stephen Nelson, 2010. "Does compliance matter? Assessing the relationship between sovereign risk and compliance with international monetary law," The Review of International Organizations, Springer, vol. 5(2), pages 107-139, June.
    18. Richard Stewart & Michael Oppenheimer & Bryce Rudyk, 2013. "A new strategy for global climate protection," Climatic Change, Springer, vol. 120(1), pages 1-12, September.

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