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Perception of Climate Change and Impact on Land Allocation and Income: Empirical Evidence from Vietnam's Delta Region

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  • Mishra, Ashok K.
  • Pede, Valerien O.
  • Barboza, Gustavo A.

Abstract

Using a sample survey from Vietnam's M&RRD, this study examines both the factors affecting smallholder households’ perceptions of climate change, and the impact of climatic change on smallholders’ income and land allocation decisions. Results show a significant and negative impact of perception of climate change on income of smallholder households. Smallholders with perceived climate changes reduce land allocated to paddy crop. Farmers make strategic decision to counter the negative effects of climate change by increasing the amount of rented land for paddy crop production, while at the same time decreasing the amount of owned land allocated to paddy crop.

Suggested Citation

  • Mishra, Ashok K. & Pede, Valerien O. & Barboza, Gustavo A., 2018. "Perception of Climate Change and Impact on Land Allocation and Income: Empirical Evidence from Vietnam's Delta Region," Agricultural and Resource Economics Review, Cambridge University Press, vol. 47(2), pages 311-335, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:cup:agrerw:v:47:y:2018:i:02:p:311-335_00
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    Cited by:

    1. Thijs Poelma & Mucahid Mustafa Bayrak & Duong Nha & Thong Anh Tran, 2021. "Climate change and livelihood resilience capacities in the Mekong Delta: a case study on the transition to rice–shrimp farming in Vietnam’s Kien Giang Province," Climatic Change, Springer, vol. 164(1), pages 1-20, January.

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