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Public infrastructure, noncooperative investments, and endogenous growth

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Listed:
  • Charles Figuières
  • Fabien Prieur
  • Mabel Tidball

Abstract

Two countries strategically invest in productive infrastructure within a general equilibrium model with endogenous growth. These public investments generate externalities. Dynamic analysis reveals that: (1) under constant returns, the two countries growth rates differ during the transition but are identical on the balanced growth path, (2) a country with decreasing returns can experience sustained growth provided that the other country grows at a positive constant rate, (3) cooperation does not necessarily lead to higher growth for each country, and it can increase or decrease the gap between countries growth rates depending on the countries consumption preferences regarding domestic and foreign goods.

Suggested Citation

  • Charles Figuières & Fabien Prieur & Mabel Tidball, 2013. "Public infrastructure, noncooperative investments, and endogenous growth," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 46(2), pages 587-610, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:cje:issued:v:46:y:2013:i:2:p:587-610
    DOI: 10.1111/caje.12024
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    17. Glomm, Gerhard & Ravikumar, B., 1994. "Public investment in infrastructure in a simple growth model," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 18(6), pages 1173-1187, November.
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    Cited by:

    1. Charles Figuières & Fabien Prieur & Mabel Tidball, 2013. "Public infrastructure, noncooperative investments, and endogenous growth," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 46(2), pages 587-610, May.
    2. Akihiko Yanase & Makoto Tawada, 2017. "Public infrastructure for production and international trade in a small open economy: a dynamic analysis," Journal of Economics, Springer, vol. 121(1), pages 51-73, May.
    3. Soldatos, Gerasimos T., 2014. "Local Taxation, Private-Public Consumption Complementarity, and the Optimal Number of Jurisdictions," MPRA Paper 60861, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • D9 - Microeconomics - - Micro-Based Behavioral Economics
    • C73 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Game Theory and Bargaining Theory - - - Stochastic and Dynamic Games; Evolutionary Games

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