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The impact of recycling on the long-run forestry

Author

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  • Didier Tatoutchoup
  • Gérard Gaudet

Abstract

Interest in recycling of forest products has grown in recent years, one of the goals being to conserve trees or possibly increase their number to compensate for positive externalities generated by the forest and neglected by the market. This paper explores the issue as to whether recycling is an appropriate measure to attain such a goal. We do this by considering the problem of the private owner of an area of land, who, acting as a price taker, decides how to allocate his land over time between forestry and some other use, and at what age to harvest the forest area chosen. Once the forest is cut, he makes a new land allocation decision and replants. He does so indefinitely, in a Faustmann-like framework. The wood from the harvest is transformed into a final product that is partly recycled into a substitute for the virgin wood, so that past output affects the current price. We show that in such a context, increasing the rate of recycling will result in less area being devoted to forestry. It will also have the effect of increasing the harvest age of the forest, as long as the planting cost is positive. The net effect on the flow of virgin wood being harvested to supply the market will as a result be ambiguous. An important point, however, is that recycling will result in fewer trees in the long run, not more. It would therefore be best to resort to other means if the goal is to conserve the area devoted to forestry.

Suggested Citation

  • Didier Tatoutchoup & Gérard Gaudet, 2011. "The impact of recycling on the long-run forestry," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 44(3), pages 804-813, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:cje:issued:v:44:y:2011:i:3:p:804-813
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