IDEAS home Printed from
   My bibliography  Save this article

China is Shipping more Products to the United States than Germany


  • Lionel Fontagné
  • Rodrigo Paillacar


Recent theoretical and empirical literature on international trade has renewed our understanding of specialisation and competition, especially between developed and emerging economies. Specialisation operates at the level of varieties instead of product or sector-level. Furthermore, competition selects the most productive firms and the best performing of their products. Using this dual approach, we investigated the market for manufactured imports in the United States. The emerging countries are winning large market shares there, particularly for the most technological products. It is especially in this field that some of them are managing to combine an increase in market share with a higher value of the products exported. How can older industrialised countries face up to this competition? The comparison between two export champions, China and Germany, illustrates how market positioning and the selection effect operate in the US market.

Suggested Citation

  • Lionel Fontagné & Rodrigo Paillacar, 2007. "China is Shipping more Products to the United States than Germany," La Lettre du CEPII, CEPII research center, issue 270.
  • Handle: RePEc:cii:cepill:2007-270

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL:
    Download Restriction: no


    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.

    Cited by:

    1. Nanno Mulder & Rodrigo Paiilacar & Soledad Zignago, 2009. "Market Positioning of Varieties in World Trade: is Latin America Losing Out on Asia?," Working Papers 2009-09, CEPII research center.
    2. Guillaume Gaulier & Julien Martin & Isabelle Méjean & Soledad Zignago, 2008. "International Trade Price Indices," Working Papers 2008-10, CEPII research center.

    More about this item



    JEL classification:

    • O53 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies - - - Asia including Middle East
    • O52 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies - - - Europe
    • O51 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies - - - U.S.; Canada
    • F10 - International Economics - - Trade - - - General
    • F14 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Empirical Studies of Trade


    Access and download statistics


    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:cii:cepill:2007-270. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (). General contact details of provider: .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.