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Teaching College Economics in a High School Setting: Lessons Learned and Implementation Strategies

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  • Kathryn Martell

    () (Montclair State University)

  • John C.Navin

    () (Southern Illinois University Edwardsville)

  • Timothy S. Sullivan

    () (Southern Illinois University at Edwardsville)

Abstract

Interest in exposing high school seniors to college level economics has risen in recent years. Under one delivery option, a dual-enrollment program, students are concurrently enrolled in college and high school, and receive credit at both institutions for the same course. These programs benefit high schools by increasing the academic rigor in the senior year, and may also aid colleges' external relations and recruitment. Colleges and universities considering such a program must recognize important administrative and student body differences between the university and high school settings. This paper summarizes the experiences of Southern Illinois University, where a dual-enrollment program was implemented in the mid 1990s, and uses this case to illustrate key differences between the two classroom environments. Suggested strategies for coping with these differences are described.

Suggested Citation

  • Kathryn Martell & John C.Navin & Timothy S. Sullivan, 2006. "Teaching College Economics in a High School Setting: Lessons Learned and Implementation Strategies," International Review of Economic Education, Economics Network, University of Bristol, vol. 5(1), pages 9-27.
  • Handle: RePEc:che:ireepp:v:5:y:2006:i:1:p:9-27
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    File URL: http://www.economicsnetwork.ac.uk/iree/v5n1/martell.pdf
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    Cited by:

    1. Lesley Mace, 2009. "Dual Enrollment: An Instructor's Perspective," International Review of Economic Education, Economics Network, University of Bristol, vol. 8(1), pages 32-47.

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