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Weapons, intelligence and property rights

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  • Alvaro Montenegro

    () (Pontificia Universidad Javeriana)

Abstract

The evolution of human intelligence and property rights is positively related to weapons and military technology. Weapons allowed males to establish property rights over females, initiating a positive feedback loop between weapons and intelligence through natural selection. Weapons and military technology then extended property rights over land and produce making agriculture possible. The first economic revolution then was the discovery of weapons, not agriculture

Suggested Citation

  • Alvaro Montenegro, 2004. "Weapons, intelligence and property rights," Colombian Economic Journal, Academia Colombiana de Ciencias Economicas, Colegio Mayor de Nuestra Senora del Rosario, Pontificia Universidad Javeriana, Universidad de Antioquia, Universidad de los Andes, Universidad del Valle, Universidad Externado de Colombia, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, vol. 2(1), pages 33-44, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:cej:primer:v:2:y:2004:i:1:p:33-44
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    File URL: http://www.fce.unal.edu.co/cej/number2/2-Montenegro.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    evolutionary approach; innovation and invention;

    JEL classification:

    • B52 - Schools of Economic Thought and Methodology - - Current Heterodox Approaches - - - Historical; Institutional; Evolutionary
    • O31 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Innovation and Invention: Processes and Incentives

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