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Globalization, Job Tasks and the Demand for Different Occupations

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Listed:
  • Fredrik Heyman
  • Fredrik Sjöholm

Abstract

Globalization has increased in recent decades, resulting in structural changes of production and labor demand. This paper examines how the increased global engagement of firms affects the structure of the workforce. We find that the aggregate distribution of occupations in Sweden has become more skilled between 1997 and 2013. Moreover, firms with a high degree of international orientation have a relatively skilled distribution of occupations and firms with low international orientation have a relatively unskilled distribution of occupations. High- and low-skilled occupations have increased in importance whereas middle-skilled occupations have declined with a resulting job polarization. We also discuss and analyze the role played by new technology and automatization. JEL: F10, F16; F23

Suggested Citation

  • Fredrik Heyman & Fredrik Sjöholm, 2019. "Globalization, Job Tasks and the Demand for Different Occupations," Travail et Emploi, La Documentation Française, vol. 0(1), pages 67-91.
  • Handle: RePEc:cai:teeldc:te_157_0067
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    occupations; job polarization; globalization; multinational enterprises; exporter; automatization;

    JEL classification:

    • F10 - International Economics - - Trade - - - General
    • F23 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - Multinational Firms; International Business

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