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Ordre et désordre dans l'échange international. Une revue de littérature

  • Guillaume Daudin
  • Jean-Luc Gaffard
  • Francesco Saraceno

This paper presents a critical survey of the literature on trade openness. In the first part we start by analyzing distributive domestic issues that arise following changing trade patterns. We identify the sources of the problems, and assess the technical and political feasibility of measures aimed at solving them. Then we examine the distribution of trade gains among countries. We highlight situations in which asymmetric productivity gains may lead to conflicts between countries despite an increase in global welfare. The second part shifts the focus on dynamic consequences of trade. We begin by the theoretical arguments on the link between trade openness and growth. We then explore the tentative empirical arguments. Finally, we highlight the importance of transition processes that affects economies experiencing changes in international trade patterns. The paper concludes with a discussion of appropriate policy measures. JEL Codes: F00, F02, F10.

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Article provided by Presses de Sciences-Po in its journal Revue de l'OFCE.

Volume (Year): 100 (2007)
Issue (Month): 1 ()
Pages: 143-174

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Handle: RePEc:cai:reofsp:reof_100_0143
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  1. Guillaume Daudin & Sandrine Levasseur, 2005. "Délocalisations et concurrence des pays émergents : mesurer l'effet sur l'emploi en France," Revue de l'OFCE, Presses de Sciences-Po, vol. 94(3), pages 131-160.
  2. Flora Bellone & Patrick Musso & Lionel Nesta & Michel Quéré, 2006. "Productivity and Market Selection of French Manufacturing Firms in the Nineties," Documents de Travail de l'OFCE 2006-04, Observatoire Francais des Conjonctures Economiques (OFCE).
  3. Bernard, Andrew B. & Jensen, J. Bradford & Schott, Peter K., 2006. "Trade costs, firms and productivity," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 53(5), pages 917-937, July.
  4. Dixit, Avinash & Norman, Victor, 1986. "Gains from trade without lump-sum compensation," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 21(1-2), pages 111-122, August.
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  7. Branko Milanovic, 2005. "Can We Discern the Effect of Globalization on Income Distribution? Evidence from Household Surveys," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 19(1), pages 21-44.
  8. Wood, Adrian, 1997. "Openness and Wage Inequality in Developing Countries: The Latin American Challenge to East Asian Conventional Wisdom," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 11(1), pages 33-57, January.
  9. Marc J. Melitz, 2003. "The Impact of Trade on Intra-Industry Reallocations and Aggregate Industry Productivity," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 71(6), pages 1695-1725, November.
  10. Jeffrey D. Sachs & Andrew Warner, 1995. "Economic Reform and the Process of Global Integration," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 26(1, 25th A), pages 1-118.
  11. Dani Rodrik, 1996. "Why Do More Open Economies Have Bigger Governments?," NBER Working Papers 5537, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  12. Brecher, Richard A., 1974. "Optimal commercial policy for a minimum-wage economy," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 4(2), pages 139-149, May.
  13. Brecher, Richard A, 1974. "Minimum Wage Rates and the Pure Theory of International Trade," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 88(1), pages 98-116, February.
  14. Lucas, Robert Jr., 1988. "On the mechanics of economic development," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 22(1), pages 3-42, July.
  15. Guesnerie, R., 2000. "Second Best Redistributive Policies : the Case of International Trade," DELTA Working Papers 2000-21, DELTA (Ecole normale supérieure).
  16. Lori G. Kletzer, 2004. "Trade-related Job Loss and Wage Insurance: a Synthetic Review," Review of International Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 12(5), pages 724-748, November.
  17. Galor, Oded & Mountford, Andrew, 2002. "Why are a Third of People Indian and Chinese? Trade, Industrialization and Demographic Transition," CEPR Discussion Papers 3136, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  18. Paul A. Samuelson, 2004. "Where Ricardo and Mill Rebut and Confirm Arguments of Mainstream Economists Supporting Globalization," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 18(3), pages 135-146, Summer.
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