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Collaborateurs, emplois familiaux et niveau d’activité des parlementaires français

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  • Benjamin Monnery

Abstract

This article takes advantage of the release in February 2017, in the aftermath of the ?Fillon scandal?, of the list of all staff members employed by the 920 French parliamentarians, to quantify family employment in the National Assembly and the Senate.?By combining this data with elected officials? demographic and political caracteristics, as well as their activity record during 12 months, we document the standard profile of parliamentarians employing family members.?In addition, we show that these deputies and senators were significantly less present, less active and less productive in the Assembly and the Senate than other parliamentarians, all else equal.

Suggested Citation

  • Benjamin Monnery, 2019. "Collaborateurs, emplois familiaux et niveau d’activité des parlementaires français," Revue économique, Presses de Sciences-Po, vol. 70(1), pages 5-29.
  • Handle: RePEc:cai:recosp:reco_701_0005
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    political economy; rent extraction; nepotism; Parliament;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • D72 - Microeconomics - - Analysis of Collective Decision-Making - - - Political Processes: Rent-seeking, Lobbying, Elections, Legislatures, and Voting Behavior

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