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Should Developing Countries Strengthen their Intellectual Property Rights?


  • Angeles Luis

    () (The University of Manchester)


This paper evaluates the welfare consequences of implementing intellectual property rights in developing countries. The protection of intellectual property in poor countries promises to increase world innovation, but this would not come without costs. Higher prices for consumers in that part of the world are the negative side of this policy.We present a general equilibrium model with two regions (the North and the South) to compare these two effects. Our main contribution is to show that the results will depend on the difference in economic development (represented by labor productivity) between the two regions. The South might suffer a net welfare loss if its productivity level is very low with respect to the North.

Suggested Citation

  • Angeles Luis, 2005. "Should Developing Countries Strengthen their Intellectual Property Rights?," The B.E. Journal of Macroeconomics, De Gruyter, vol. 5(1), pages 1-25, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:bpj:bejmac:v:topics.5:y:2005:i:1:n:23

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    8. Rebelo, Sergio, 1991. "Long-Run Policy Analysis and Long-Run Growth," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 99(3), pages 500-521, June.
    9. Hall, Robert E, 1988. "Intertemporal Substitution in Consumption," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 96(2), pages 339-357, April.
    10. Dajin Li, 2002. "Is the AK model still alive? The long-run relation between growth and investment re-examined," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 35(1), pages 92-114, February.
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    Cited by:

    1. Luis Angeles, 2011. "Institutions, Property Rights, and Economic Development in Historical Perspective," Kyklos, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 64(2), pages 157-177, May.
    2. Walter Park, 2012. "North–South models of intellectual property rights: an empirical critique," Review of World Economics (Weltwirtschaftliches Archiv), Springer;Institut für Weltwirtschaft (Kiel Institute for the World Economy), vol. 148(1), pages 151-180, April.

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