IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/bla/revinw/v40y1994i2p217-22.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Growth, Inequality, and Poverty: A Cautionary Note

Author

Listed:
  • Smolensky, Eugene, et al

Abstract

Economic growth had less impact on poverty rates in the 1980s than in the 1960s. Could this be explained by Locke Anderson's observation that the higher median income, the greater the amount of growth needed to achieve a percentage point fall in the poverty rate? No, higher poverty rates are due instead to the rise in income inequality. With higher inequality, however, trickle down could be as effective in the 1990s as it was in the late 1960s. More generally, assessments of antipoverty policy must recognize that inequality is as vital to changes in the poverty rate as growth in mean income. Coauthors are Robert Plotnick, Eirik Evenhouse, and Siobhan Reilly. Copyright 1994 by The International Association for Research in Income and Wealth.

Suggested Citation

  • Smolensky, Eugene, et al, 1994. "Growth, Inequality, and Poverty: A Cautionary Note," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 40(2), pages 217-222, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:revinw:v:40:y:1994:i:2:p:217-22
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    To our knowledge, this item is not available for download. To find whether it is available, there are three options:
    1. Check below whether another version of this item is available online.
    2. Check on the provider's web page whether it is in fact available.
    3. Perform a search for a similarly titled item that would be available.

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Thomas Groll & Peter J. Lambert, 2013. "The Pro-Poorness, Growth and Inequality Nexus: Some Findings From a Simulation Study," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 59(4), pages 776-784, December.
    2. Rana Hasan & M.G. Quibria & Yangseon Kim, 2003. "Poverty and Economic Freedom: Evidence from Cross-Country Data," Economics Study Area Working Papers 60, East-West Center, Economics Study Area.
    3. James E. Foster & Miguel Székely, 2008. "Is Economic Growth Good For The Poor? Tracking Low Incomes Using General Means," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 49(4), pages 1143-1172, November.
    4. Lin, Zhengxi & Zhengxi, Lin & Zyblock, Miles, 1997. "Trickling Down or Fizzling Out? Economic Performance, Transfers, Inequality and Low Income," Analytical Studies Branch Research Paper Series 1997110e, Statistics Canada, Analytical Studies Branch.
    5. James E. Foster & Miguel Székely, 2001. "¿Es el crecimiento económico bueno para los pobres? Seguimiento del ingreso bajo con medias generales," Research Department Publications 4270, Inter-American Development Bank, Research Department.
    6. Ke-Mei Chen & Te-Mu Wang, 2015. "Determinants of Poverty Status in Taiwan: A Multilevel Approach," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 123(2), pages 371-389, September.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:bla:revinw:v:40:y:1994:i:2:p:217-22. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Wiley-Blackwell Digital Licensing) or (Christopher F. Baum). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/iariwea.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.