IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/bla/reviec/v12y2004i3p525-542.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Why Do More Open Chinese Provinces Have Bigger Governments?

Author

Listed:
  • Sylviane Guillaumont Jeanneney
  • Ping Hua

Abstract

The transition of China towards a market economy was accompanied by a vast fiscal decentralization movement. Econometric analysis of the determinants of public expenditure of the Chinese provinces does not permit rejection of the hypotheses that (i) the behavior of provinces is similar to that of governments in developing economies significantly affected by external shocks, and (ii) in order to alleviate external risk, they take control of a more significant share of the revenues of the economy. Copyright Blackwell Publishing Ltd 2004.

Suggested Citation

  • Sylviane Guillaumont Jeanneney & Ping Hua, 2004. "Why Do More Open Chinese Provinces Have Bigger Governments?," Review of International Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 12(3), pages 525-542, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:reviec:v:12:y:2004:i:3:p:525-542
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.blackwell-synergy.com/links/doi/10.1111/j.1467-9396.2004.00465.x
    File Function: link to full text
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Economides, Nicholas, 1999. "Quality choice and vertical integration," International Journal of Industrial Organization, Elsevier, pages 903-914.
    2. Knetter, Michael M, 1989. "Price Discrimination by U.S. and German Exporters," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, pages 198-210.
    3. Paul Krugman, 1986. "Pricing to Market when the Exchange Rate Changes," NBER Working Papers 1926, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Atish R. Ghosh & Holger C. Wolf, 1994. "Pricing in International Markets: Lessons from The Economist," Working Papers 94-21, New York University, Leonard N. Stern School of Business, Department of Economics.
    5. Parsley, David C, 1995. "Exchange-Rate Pass-through with Intertemporal Linkages: Evidence at the Commodity Level," Review of International Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 3(3), pages 330-341, October.
    6. Pinelopi Koujianou Goldberg & Michael M. Knetter, 1997. "Goods Prices and Exchange Rates: What Have We Learned?," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, pages 1243-1272.
    7. Marston, Richard C., 1990. "Pricing to market in Japanese manufacturing," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, pages 217-236.
    8. Taylor, John B., 2000. "Low inflation, pass-through, and the pricing power of firms," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 44(7), pages 1389-1408, June.
    9. Michael Bleaney, 1997. "Invoicing-Currency Effects in the Pricing of Japanese Exports of Manufactures," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 30(4), pages 968-974, November.
    10. Froot, Kenneth A & Klemperer, Paul D, 1989. "Exchange Rate Pass-Through When Market Share Matters," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, pages 637-654.
    11. Jonathan McCarthy, 2007. "Pass-Through of Exchange Rates and Import Prices to Domestic Inflation in Some Industrialized Economies," Eastern Economic Journal, Eastern Economic Association, pages 511-537.
    12. Dornbusch, Rudiger, 1987. "Exchange Rates and Prices," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, pages 93-106.
    13. Sven W. Arndt & J. David Richardson, 1987. "Real-Financial Linkages Among Open Economies," NBER Working Papers 2230, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    14. Irving B. Kravis & Robert E. Lipsey, 1975. "International Trade Prices and Price Proxies," NBER Chapters,in: The Role of the Computer in Economic and Social Research in Latin America, pages 253-268 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    15. Ilan Goldfajn & Sérgio Ribeiro da Costa Werlang, 2000. "The Pass-through from Depreciation to Inflation: A Panel Study," Working Papers Series 5, Central Bank of Brazil, Research Department.
    16. Yushi Yoshida & Shinji Takagi, 1999. "Exchange Rate Movements and Tradable Goods Prices in East Asia; An Analysis Based on Japanese Customs Data, 1988-98," IMF Working Papers 99/31, International Monetary Fund.
    17. Dornbusch, Rudiger, 1987. "Exchange Rates and Prices," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, pages 93-106.
    18. Froot, Kenneth A & Klemperer, Paul D, 1989. "Exchange Rate Pass-Through When Market Share Matters," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, pages 637-654.
    19. Catherine L. Mann, 1986. "Prices, profit margins, and exchange rates," Federal Reserve Bulletin, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.), pages 366-379.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Guillaumont Jeanneney, Sylviane & Hua, Ping, 2011. "How does real exchange rate influence labour productivity in China?," China Economic Review, Elsevier, pages 628-645.
    2. Estela Sáenz & Marcela Sabaté & M. Gadea, 2013. "Trade openness and public expenditure. The Spanish case, 1960–2000," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 154(3), pages 173-195, March.
    3. Elliott Parker & Judith Thornton, 2007. "Fiscal Centralisation and Decentralisation in Russia and China," Comparative Economic Studies, Palgrave Macmillan;Association for Comparative Economic Studies, vol. 49(4), pages 514-542, December.
    4. Estela Sáenz Rodríguez & Marcela Sabaté Sort & Mª. Dolores Gadea Rivas, 2011. "¿Condiciona la apertura exterior el tamaño del sector público? Un panorama," Hacienda Pública Española, IEF, pages 131-149.
    5. Jabin Jacob, 2006. "European integration and lessons for China," Asia Europe Journal, Springer, vol. 4(4), pages 511-521, December.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:bla:reviec:v:12:y:2004:i:3:p:525-542. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Wiley-Blackwell Digital Licensing) or (Christopher F. Baum). General contact details of provider: http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journal.asp?ref=0965-7576 .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.