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Peopling The Victorian Goldfields: From Boom To Bust, 1851-1901


  • Charles Fahey


Victoria experienced a surge of migration after the discovery of gold in 1851. I explore the social and geographic background of migrants lured to the colony by opportunities opened up by gold mining. When alluvial gold was exhausted, the skills of migrants enabled them to exploit the more difficult deep lead and quartz reef gold deposits and to establish cities and towns. Urban growth was encouraged by high marriage and birth rates in the 1860s. In the last two decades of the nineteenth century goldfields communities generally suffered economic and demographic declines. Copyright 2010 The Author. Journal compilation Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd and the Economic History Society of Australia and New Zealand 2010.

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  • Charles Fahey, 2010. "Peopling The Victorian Goldfields: From Boom To Bust, 1851-1901," Australian Economic History Review, Economic History Society of Australia and New Zealand, vol. 50(2), pages 148-161, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:ozechr:v:50:y:2010:i:2:p:148-161

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Van Zanden, Jan Luiten, 2004. "On the Efficiency of Markets for Agricultural Products: Rice Prices and Capital Markets in Java, 1823 1853," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 64(04), pages 1028-1055, December.
    2. Ellis,Frank, 1992. "Agricultural Policies in Developing Countries," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521395847, March.
    3. Peter H. Lindert, 2000. "Shifting Ground: The Changing Agricultural Soils of China and Indonesia," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262122278, January.
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