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The historical origins of the Philippine economy: a survey of recent research of the Spanish colonial era

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  • Josep M. Fradera

Abstract

This article surveys recent research of the Spanish colonial era in the Philippines since the late eighteenth century. While highlighting imperfections in our understanding, the article establishes the parameters with which the Philippine economy entered the twentieth century. It outlines the intensification of Spanish colonial rule through changes in the taxation system, particularly the expansion of forced tobacco cultivation until its abolition in 1882. Since then, the Spanish set out to further change and intensify colonial rule but contradictions in the system of colonial rule caused the effort to come to an abrupt end in 1898. Copyright Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd and the Economic History Society of Australia and New Zealand 2004.

Suggested Citation

  • Josep M. Fradera, 2004. "The historical origins of the Philippine economy: a survey of recent research of the Spanish colonial era," Australian Economic History Review, Economic History Society of Australia and New Zealand, vol. 44(3), pages 307-320, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:ozechr:v:44:y:2004:i:3:p:307-320
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Jean-Pascal Bassino & Marion Dovis & John Komlos, 2015. "Biological Well-Being in Late 19th Century Philippines," NBER Working Papers 21410, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

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