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Tuition Fees and University Enrolment: A Meta‐Regression Analysis

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  • Tomas Havranek
  • Zuzana Irsova
  • Olesia Zeynalova

Abstract

One of the most frequently examined relationships in education economics is the correlation between tuition fee increases and the demand for higher education. We provide a quantitative synthesis of 443 estimates of this effect reported in 43 studies. While large negative estimates dominate the literature, we show that researchers report positive and insignificant estimates less often than they should. After correcting for this publication bias, we find that the literature is consistent with the mean tuition–enrolment elasticity being close to zero. Nevertheless, we identify substantial heterogeneity among the reported effects: for example, male students and students at private universities display larger elasticities. The results are robust to controlling for model uncertainty, using both Bayesian and frequentist methods of model averaging.

Suggested Citation

  • Tomas Havranek & Zuzana Irsova & Olesia Zeynalova, 2018. "Tuition Fees and University Enrolment: A Meta‐Regression Analysis," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 80(6), pages 1145-1184, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:obuest:v:80:y:2018:i:6:p:1145-1184
    DOI: 10.1111/obes.12240
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    File URL: https://doi.org/10.1111/obes.12240
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    Cited by:

    1. Kudela, Peter & Havranek, Tomas & Herman, Dominik & Irsova, Zuzana, 2020. "Does daylight saving time save electricity? Evidence from Slovakia," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 137(C).
    2. Cazachevici, Alina & Havranek, Tomas & Horvath, Roman, 2019. "Remittances and Economic Growth: A Quantitative Survey," EconStor Preprints 205812, ZBW - Leibniz Information Centre for Economics.
    3. Tomas Havranek & Anna Sokolova, 2020. "Do Consumers Really Follow a Rule of Thumb? Three Thousand Estimates from 144 Studies Say 'Probably Not'," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 35, pages 97-122, January.
    4. Jindrich Matousek, 2018. "Individual Discount Rates: A Meta-Analysis of the Experimental Evidence," Working Papers IES 2018/40, Charles University Prague, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute of Economic Studies, revised Dec 2018.
    5. Yin-Wong Cheung & Wenhao Wang, 2019. "A Jackknife Model Averaging Analysis of RMB Misalignment Estimates," IEER Working Papers 116, Institute of Empirical Economic Research, Osnabrueck University.
    6. Hieu Nguyen, 2019. "Free tuition and college enrollment: evidence from New York’s Excelsior program," Education Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 27(6), pages 573-587, November.
    7. Steel, Mark F. J., 2017. "Model Averaging and its Use in Economics," MPRA Paper 81568, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    8. Anton Astakhov & Tomas Havranek & Jiri Novak, 2019. "Firm Size And Stock Returns: A Quantitative Survey," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 33(5), pages 1463-1492, December.
    9. Mojmir Hampl & Tomas Havranek, 2020. "Central Bank Equity as an Instrument of Monetary Policy," Comparative Economic Studies, Palgrave Macmillan;Association for Comparative Economic Studies, vol. 62(1), pages 49-68, March.
    10. Thi Mai Lan Nguyen, 2020. "Output Effects of Monetary Policy in Emerging and Developing Countries: Evidence from a Meta-Analysis," Emerging Markets Finance and Trade, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 56(1), pages 68-85, January.

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