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Modes of Entrance by Gender and Wage Differential in the French Labour Market


  • Stéphane Moulin


This paper explores the gender wage differential after the exit from school in France. Using survey longitudinal data on young men and women leaving the French school system in 1998, we show that the residual entrance-level wage differential by gender may be explained by the expected gender differential of access to job opportunities. A hierarchical classification is used to estimate the probability to obtain easy access to non-subsidized jobs. After control for hours worked and hierarchical levels, and for the predicted values of this previous estimation, we find no significant impact of gender on entrance-level wages. Copyright 2006 The Author. Journal compilation CEIS, Fondazione Giacomo Brodolini and Blackwell Publishing Ltd. 2006.

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  • Stéphane Moulin, 2006. "Modes of Entrance by Gender and Wage Differential in the French Labour Market," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 20(4), pages 581-599, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:labour:v:20:y:2006:i:4:p:581-599

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