IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/bla/jorssa/v176y2013i2p541-563.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Intergenerational persistence in income and social class: the effect of within-group inequality

Author

Listed:
  • Jo Blanden
  • Paul Gregg
  • Lindsey Macmillan

Abstract

No abstract is available for this item.

Suggested Citation

  • Jo Blanden & Paul Gregg & Lindsey Macmillan, 2013. "Intergenerational persistence in income and social class: the effect of within-group inequality," Journal of the Royal Statistical Society Series A, Royal Statistical Society, vol. 176(2), pages 541-563, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:jorssa:v:176:y:2013:i:2:p:541-563
    DOI: j.1467-985X.2012.01053.x
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1111/j.1467-985X.2012.01053.x
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Jantti, Markus & Jenkins, Stephen P., 2013. "Income mobility," ISER Working Paper Series 2013-23, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    2. repec:bla:obuest:v:79:y:2017:i:1:p:79-100 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Jo Blanden & Lindsey Macmillan, 2014. "Education and Intergenerational Mobility: Help or Hindrance?," CASE Papers case179, Centre for Analysis of Social Exclusion, LSE.
    4. repec:eee:socmed:v:230:y:2019:i:c:p:37-48 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Jo Blanden & Robert Haveman & Timothy Smeeding & Kathryn Wilson, 2014. "Intergenerational Mobility in the United States and Great Britain: A Comparative Study of Parent–Child Pathways," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 60(3), pages 425-449, September.
    6. Bukodi, Erzsébet & Goldthorpe, John H. & Waller, Lorraine & Kuha, Jouni, 2015. "The mobility problem in Britain: new findings from the analysis of birth cohort data," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 60249, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    7. repec:spr:jopoec:v:32:y:2019:i:2:d:10.1007_s00148-018-0722-z is not listed on IDEAS
    8. Jo Blanden & Stephen Machin, 2017. "Home ownership and social mobility," CentrePiece - The Magazine for Economic Performance 508, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
    9. Brian Bell & Jack Blundell & Stephen Machin, 2018. "The Changing Geography of Intergenerational Mobility," CEP Discussion Papers dp1591, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
    10. Andrew Dickerson & Gurleen Popli, 2015. "The many dimensions of child poverty: Evidence from the UK Millennium Cohort Study," Working Papers 2015009, The University of Sheffield, Department of Economics.
    11. Bertha Rohenkohl, 2019. "Intergenerational Income Mobility in the UK:New evidence using the BHPS and Understanding Society," Working Papers 2019017, The University of Sheffield, Department of Economics.
    12. Marcenaro Gutierrez, Oscar & Micklewright, John & Vignoles, Anna, 2014. "Social Mobility and the Importance of Networks: Evidence for Britain," IZA Discussion Papers 8380, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    13. Gurleen Popli & Aki Tsuchiya, 2014. "Sons and Daughters: Parental Beliefs and Child Behaviour (Evidence from the UK Millennium Cohort Study)," Working Papers 2014013, The University of Sheffield, Department of Economics.
    14. Chris Belfield & Claire Crawford & Ellen Greaves & Paul Gregg & Lindsey Macmillan, 2017. "Intergenerational income persistence within families," IFS Working Papers W17/11, Institute for Fiscal Studies.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:bla:jorssa:v:176:y:2013:i:2:p:541-563. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Wiley Content Delivery). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/rssssea.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.