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Through the magnifying glass: provincial aspects of industrial growth in post-Unification Italy




In post-Unification Italy industrialization was ever sharply sub-regional. Initially industry was largely artisanal, and located in the former political capitals; factory industry was instead attracted by the waterfalls of the subalpine Northwest. From the 1880s, as modernization accelerated, industry concentrated: in the Lombard and Piedmontese subalpine provinces with the late-nineteenth-century boom in (protected) textiles, then particularly in Turin and Milan with the engineering boom, and novel energy-transmission, of the belle �poque; and in Liguria's Genoa, which captured (subsidized) civil and naval shipbuilding. The only significant diffusion came as (newly protected) beet-sugar-extraction spread throughout Emilia.
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Suggested Citation

  • Carlo Ciccarelli & Stefano Fenoaltea, 2013. "Through the magnifying glass: provincial aspects of industrial growth in post-Unification Italy," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 66(1), pages 57-85, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:ehsrev:v:66:y:2013:i:1:p:57-85
    DOI: 10.1111/ehr.2013.66.issue-1

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Esposto, Alfredo G., 1992. "Italian Industrialization and the Gerschenkronian “Great Spurt”: A Regional Analysis," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 52(02), pages 353-362, June.
    2. Ringrose, David R., 1968. "Transportation and Economic Stagnation in Eighteenth-Century Castile," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 28(01), pages 51-79, March.
    3. Walter Isard, 1948. "Some Locational Factors in the Iron and Steel Industry since the Early Nineteenth Century," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 56, pages 203-203.
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    Cited by:

    1. Bertocchi, Graziella & Bozzano, Monica, 2016. "Women, medieval commerce, and the education gender gap," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 44(3), pages 496-521.
    2. Emanuele Felice, 2011. "The determinants of Italy’s regional imbalances over the long run: exploring the contributions of human and social capital," Oxford University Economic and Social History Series _088, Economics Group, Nuffield College, University of Oxford.
    3. Graziella Bertocchi & Monica Bozzano, 2015. "Family Structure and the Education Gender Gap: Evidence from Italian Provinces," CESifo Economic Studies, CESifo, vol. 61(1), pages 263-300.
    4. Bozzano, Monica, 2017. "On the historical roots of women's empowerment across Italian provinces: religion or family culture?," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 49(C), pages 24-46.
    5. Brian A'Hearn & Anthony J. Venables, 2011. "Internal Geography and External Trade: regional disparities in Italy, 1861-2011," Quaderni di storia economica (Economic History Working Papers) 12, Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area.
    6. Bertocchi, Graziella & Bozzano, Monica, 2016. "Origins and implications of family structure across Italian provinces in historical perspective," CEPR Discussion Papers 11617, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    7. Vittorio Daniele & Paolo Malanima, 2014. "Falling disparities and persisting dualism: Regional development and industrialisation in Italy, 1891–2001," Investigaciones de Historia Económica (IHE) Journal of the Spanish Economic History Association, Asociacion Espa–ola de Historia Economica, vol. 10(03), pages 165-176.
    8. Emanuele Felice, 2015. "La stima e l’interpretazione dei divari regionali nel lungo periodo: i risultati principali e alcune tracce di ricerca," SCIENZE REGIONALI, FrancoAngeli Editore, vol. 2015(3), pages 91-120.
    9. repec:rie:review:v:17:y:2012:i:3:n:2 is not listed on IDEAS
    10. Martinelli, Pablo, 2014. "Latifundia revisited: Market power, land inequality and agricultural efficiency. Evidence from interwar Italian agriculture," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 54(C), pages 79-106.
    11. Guerriero, Carmine & de Oliveira, Guilherme, 2014. "Extractive States: The Case of the Italian Unification," MPRA Paper 70916, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 13 Apr 2016.
    12. Enflo, Kerstin & Missiaia, Anna, 2017. "Regional GDP estimates for Sweden, 1571-1850," Lund Papers in Economic History 162, Lund University, Department of Economic History.
    13. Graziella Bertocchi & Monica Bozzano, 2016. "Origins and implications of family structure across Italian provinces in historical perspective," Department of Economics 0095, University of Modena and Reggio E., Faculty of Economics "Marco Biagi".
    14. Rowena Gray & Gaia Narciso & Gaspare Tortorici, 2017. "Globalization, Agricultural Markets and Mass Migration," CReAM Discussion Paper Series 1713, Centre for Research and Analysis of Migration (CReAM), Department of Economics, University College London.
    15. Pezzuto, Roberto, 2015. "The age distribution of Italy’s labor force in 1911 and its implications for the economy’s past: new evidence on the long swing in investment from unification to the Great War," MPRA Paper 67032, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    16. Del Monte, Alfredo & Pennacchio, Luca, 2011. "The structure of agricultural production and the causes of brigandage and criminal organisations in Italy after Unification: theory and evidence," MPRA Paper 38875, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    17. Nicola Pontarollo & Roberto Ricciuti, 2015. "Railways and the Productivity Gap in Italy: Persistence and Divergence after Unification," CESifo Working Paper Series 5438, CESifo Group Munich.
    18. Gabriele Cappelli, 2016. "One size that didn’t fit all? Electoral franchise, fiscal capacity and the rise of mass schooling across Italy’s provinces, 1870–1911," Cliometrica, Springer;Cliometric Society (Association Francaise de Cliométrie), vol. 10(3), pages 311-343, September.
    19. Monica Bozzano, 2015. "On the Historical Roots of Women’s Empowerment across Italian Provinces: Religion or Family Culture?," Department of Economics 0052, University of Modena and Reggio E., Faculty of Economics "Marco Biagi".
    20. Carlo Ciccarelli & Tommaso Proietti, 2013. "Patterns of industrial specialisation in post-Unification Italy," Scandinavian Economic History Review, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 61(3), pages 259-286, November.
    21. repec:mul:jqat1f:v:17:y:2012:i:3:n:2 is not listed on IDEAS
    22. Emanuele Felice, 2012. "Regional convergence in Italy, 1891–2001: testing human and social capital," Cliometrica, Journal of Historical Economics and Econometric History, Association Française de Cliométrie (AFC), vol. 6(3), pages 267-306, October.
    23. Stefano Fenoaltea, 2015. "Italian Industrial Production, 1861-1913: A Statistical Reconstruction. A. Introduction," Carlo Alberto Notebooks 412, Collegio Carlo Alberto.
    24. Martinelli, Pablo, 2012. "Von Thünen South of the Alps : Access to Markets and Interwar Italian Agriculture," IFCS - Working Papers in Economic History.WH wp12-12, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid. Instituto Figuerola.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • N63 - Economic History - - Manufacturing and Construction - - - Europe: Pre-1913
    • N93 - Economic History - - Regional and Urban History - - - Europe: Pre-1913
    • R11 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Regional Economic Activity: Growth, Development, Environmental Issues, and Changes


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