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Irreversible Investment and Strategic Interaction


  • Fatas, Antonio
  • Metrick, Andrew


This paper introduces an aggregate demand externality into a model of irreversible investment. The central result of the paper establishes the mechanism in which increases in uncertainty can lead to suboptimal recessions. These inefficient outcomes occur even if agents are allowed to coordinate to the best possible equilibria. The result is driven by the external effects of firms' investment decisions. Copyright 1997 by The London School of Economics and Political Science

Suggested Citation

  • Fatas, Antonio & Metrick, Andrew, 1997. "Irreversible Investment and Strategic Interaction," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 64(253), pages 31-47, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:econom:v:64:y:1997:i:253:p:31-47

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Chong, Alberto & Lopez-de-Silanes, Florencio, 2002. "Privatization and labor force restructuring around the world," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2884, The World Bank.
    2. Boycko, Maxim & Shleifer, Andrei & Vishny, Robert W, 1996. "A Theory of Privatisation," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 106(435), pages 309-319, March.
    3. John Vickers & George Yarrow, 1991. "Economic Perspectives on Privatization," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 5(2), pages 111-132, Spring.
    4. Wallsten, Scott, 2002. "Does sequencing matter? regulation and privatization in telecommunications reforms," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2817, The World Bank.
    5. Rafael La Porta & Florencio Lopez-de-Silanes & Andrei Shleifer & Robert W. Vishny, 1998. "Law and Finance," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 106(6), pages 1113-1155, December.
    6. Kahn, Charles M, 1985. "Optimal Severance Pay with Incomplete Information," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 93(3), pages 435-451, June.
    7. Olivier Boylaud & Giuseppe Nicoletti, 2003. "Regulation, market structure and performance in telecommunications," OECD Economic Studies, OECD Publishing, vol. 2001(1), pages 99-142.
    8. Rama, Martin, 1999. "Public Sector Downsizing: An Introduction," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 13(1), pages 1-22, January.
    9. Jeon, Doh-Shin & Laffont, Jean-Jacques, 1999. "The Efficient Mechanism for Downsizing the Public Sector," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 13(1), pages 67-88, January.
    10. Freeman, Richard B, 1986. "Unionism Comes to the Public Sector," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 24(1), pages 41-86, March.
    11. Roland, Gerard, 1994. "On the Speed and Sequencing of Privatisation and Restructuring," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 104(426), pages 1158-1168, September.
    12. Wallsten, S.J., 2000. "Telecommunications Privatization in Developing Countries: The Real Effects of Exclusivity Periods," Papers 99-031, United Nations World Employment Programme-.
    13. Kerim Peren Arin & Cagla Okten, 2003. "The determinants of privatization prices: evidence from Turkey," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 35(12), pages 1393-1404.
    14. Jeffry M. Netter & William L. Megginson, 2001. "From State to Market: A Survey of Empirical Studies on Privatization," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 39(2), pages 321-389, June.
    15. Dewenter, Kathryn L & Malatesta, Paul H, 1997. " Public Offerings of State-Owned and Privately-Owned Enterprises: An International Comparison," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 52(4), pages 1659-1679, September.
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    Cited by:

    1. Vercammen, James, 2000. "Irreversible investment under uncertainty and the threat of bankruptcy," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 66(3), pages 319-325, March.
    2. David Kelsey & Wei Pang, 2010. "How productive is optimism? the Impact of ambiguity on the "big push"," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 30(1), pages 855-865.
    3. Kelsey, David & Pang, Wei, 2009. "How Productive is Optimism? A Simple Keynes-type "Big Push" Model," Economics Discussion Papers 2009-2, School of Economics, Kingston University London.

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