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Multiple Directorships and Corporate Performance in Australian Listed Companies


  • Geoffrey C. Kiel
  • Gavin J. Nicholson

    (Queensland University of Technology)


How many directorships are too many? Globally, normative advice emphasises the importance of limiting the number of directorships any individual should hold due to the workloads they entail. However, there is little empirical evidence to support this view. Rather, there is a strong tradition of supporting multiple directorships as a mechanism for the firm to co-opt external resources. To explore the issue of director workloads and multiple directorships, we first consider the issues related to multiple directorships and outline the conclusions of extant international and Australian studies into multiple directorships. We then detail our objectives in undertaking this research and our approach to data collection. Copyright (c) 2006 The Authors; Journal compilation (c) 2006 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

Suggested Citation

  • Geoffrey C. Kiel & Gavin J. Nicholson, 2006. "Multiple Directorships and Corporate Performance in Australian Listed Companies," Corporate Governance: An International Review, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 14(6), pages 530-546, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:corgov:v:14:y:2006:i:6:p:530-546

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Charkham, Jonathan & Simpson, Anne, 1999. "Fair Shares: The Future of Shareholder Power and Responsibility," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780198292142, June.
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    Cited by:

    1. Ji, Xu (Jane) & Boyle, Glenn, 2011. "New Zealand Corporate Boards in Transition: Composition, Activity and Incentives Between 1995 and 2010," Working Paper Series 4105, Victoria University of Wellington, The New Zealand Institute for the Study of Competition and Regulation.
    2. Corinne Cortese, 2009. "A Profile of the Non-Executive Directors of Australia's Largest Companies," Australian Accounting Review, CPA Australia, vol. 19(1), pages 33-41, March.
    3. Ku Ismail, Ku Nor Izah & Abdul Manaf, Kamarul Bahrain, 2016. "Market reactions to the appointment of women to the boards of Malaysian firms," Journal of Multinational Financial Management, Elsevier, vol. 36(C), pages 75-88.
    4. Bernard P.A. Santen & Auke de Bos, 2015. "The Effects of Legal Measures to Empower Supervisory Directors: Evidence from a Financial Distress Perspective," Journal of Management and Strategy, Journal of Management and Strategy, Sciedu Press, vol. 6(1), pages 45-61, February.
    5. Hristos Doucouliagos & Janto Haman & Saeed Askary, 2007. "Directors' Remuneration and Performance in Australian Banking," Corporate Governance: An International Review, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 15(6), pages 1363-1383, November.
    6. Isabel-María García-Sánchez, 2010. "The effectiveness of corporate governance: board structure and business technical efficiency in Spain," Central European Journal of Operations Research, Springer;Slovak Society for Operations Research;Hungarian Operational Research Society;Czech Society for Operations Research;Österr. Gesellschaft für Operations Research (ÖGOR);Slovenian Society Informatika - Section for Operational Research;Croatian Operational Research Society, vol. 18(3), pages 311-339, September.
    7. Fernández Méndez, Carlos & Pathan, Shams & Arrondo García, Rubén, 2015. "Monitoring capabilities of busy and overlap directors: Evidence from Australia," Pacific-Basin Finance Journal, Elsevier, vol. 35(PA), pages 444-469.
    8. Pombo, Carlos & Gutiérrez, Luis H., 2011. "Outside directors, board interlocks and firm performance: Empirical evidence from Colombian business groups," Journal of Economics and Business, Elsevier, vol. 63(4), pages 251-277, July.
    9. repec:bla:acctfi:v:57:y:2017:i:2:p:429-463 is not listed on IDEAS
    10. Suha Alawi, 2014. "Corporate Governance and Cartel formation," Proceedings of Economics and Finance Conferences 0401246, International Institute of Social and Economic Sciences.
    11. Szymon Kaczmarek & Satomi Kimino & Annie Pye, 2014. "Interlocking directorships and firm performance in highly regulated sectors: the moderating impact of board diversity," Journal of Management & Governance, Springer;Accademia Italiana di Economia Aziendale (AIDEA), vol. 18(2), pages 347-372, May.

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