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Overcoming Anomalies in the Interaction of Tax and Social Security

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  • David Ingles

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  • David Ingles, 1998. "Overcoming Anomalies in the Interaction of Tax and Social Security," Australian Economic Review, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, vol. 31(3), pages 271-280.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:ausecr:v:31:y:1998:i:3:p:271-280
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Stephen Jenkins & Philippe Kerm, 2005. "Accounting for income distribution trends: A density function decomposition approach," The Journal of Economic Inequality, Springer;Society for the Study of Economic Inequality, pages 43-61.
    2. Podder, Nripesh & Chatterjee, Srikanta, 2002. "Sharing the national cake in post reform New Zealand: income inequality trends in terms of income sources," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 86(1), pages 1-27, October.
    3. Lars Osberg, 1998. "Economic Insecurity," Discussion Papers 0088, University of New South Wales, Social Policy Research Centre.
    4. Juhn, Chinhui & Murphy, Kevin M & Pierce, Brooks, 1993. "Wage Inequality and the Rise in Returns to Skill," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 101(3), pages 410-442, June.
    5. Jenkins, Stephen P & Cowell, Frank A, 1994. "Parametric Equivalence Scales and Scale Relativities," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 104(425), pages 891-900, July.
    6. René Böheim & Stephen P. Jenkins, 2000. "Do Current Income and Annual Income Measures Provide Different Pictures of Britain's Income Distribution?," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 214, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
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    Cited by:

    1. Matthew Gray & David Stanton, 2004. "Lessons of United States welfare reforms for Australian social policy," Others 0405002, EconWPA.
    2. Duncan, Alan & Harris, Mark N, 2002. "Simulating the Behavioural Effects of Welfare Reforms among Sole Parents in Australia," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 78(242), pages 264-276, September.
    3. Gray, Matthew & Renda, Jenny, 2006. "Reservation wages and the earnings capacity of lone and couple mothers: Are wage expectations too high?," MPRA Paper 1067, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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