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Predicting performance in undergraduate agricultural economics


  • Elizabeth Nolan
  • Fredoun Z. Ahmadi-Esfahani


Entry to the Bachelor of Agricultural Economics (BAgrEc) program at the University of Sydney is consistently less competitive than that for the Bachelor of Economics (BEc) and Bachelor of Commerce (BComm) programs. Given that students in the BAgrEc program undertake units in common with students in the BEc and BComm programs, it is of interest to examine the importance of school performance and first year university in the determination of success at university. This paper takes information for nine cohorts of BAgrEc students and tests their performance in first-year core subjects against the university entrance ranking, school English and mathematics marks, gender, and type of school. The paper then uses the same information to predict which student characteristics at entry level are likely to lead to students completing the degree program. The implications of the analysis are explored. Copyright 2007 The Authors Journal compilation 2007 Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society Inc. and Blackwell Publishing Ltd .

Suggested Citation

  • Elizabeth Nolan & Fredoun Z. Ahmadi-Esfahani, 2007. "Predicting performance in undergraduate agricultural economics ," Australian Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society, vol. 51(1), pages 1-15, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:ajarec:v:51:y:2007:i:1:p:1-15

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. R. Maria Saleth & Ariel Dinar, 2004. "The Institutional Economics of Water : A Cross-Country Analysis of Institutions and Performance," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 14884.
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    Cited by:

    1. Girijasankar Mallik & John Lodewijks, 2010. "Student Performance in a Large First Year Economics Subject: Which Variables are Significant?," Economic Papers, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 29(1), pages 80-86, March.
    2. Mallik, Girijasankar & Shankar, Sriram, 2016. "Does prior knowledge of economics and higher level mathematics improve student learning in principles of economics?," Economic Analysis and Policy, Elsevier, vol. 49(C), pages 66-73.

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