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The Distributional Impacts of Minimum Wage Increases When Both Labor Supply and Labor Demand Are Endogenous

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  • Ahn, Tom
  • Arcidiacono, Peter
  • Wessels, Walter

Abstract

We develop and estimate a one-shot search model with endogenous firm entry, and therefore zero expected profits, and endogenous labor supply. Positive employment effects from a minimum wage increase can result as the employment level depends upon both the numbers of searching firms and workers. Welfare implications are similar to the classical analysis: workers who most want the minimum wage jobs are hurt by the minimum wage hike with workers marginally interested in minimum wage jobs benefiting. We estimate the model using CPS data on teenagers and show that small changes in the employment level are masking large changes in labor supply and demand. Teenagers from well-educated families see increases in their employment probabilities and push out their less-privileged counterparts from the labor market. This article has supplementary material online.
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  • Ahn, Tom & Arcidiacono, Peter & Wessels, Walter, 2011. "The Distributional Impacts of Minimum Wage Increases When Both Labor Supply and Labor Demand Are Endogenous," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 29(1), pages 12-23.
  • Handle: RePEc:bes:jnlbes:v:29:i:1:y:2011:p:12-23
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    Blog mentions

    As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
    1. Unemployment and the Minimum Wage
      by Don Boudreaux in Cafe Hayek on 2013-09-18 20:56:24

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    Cited by:

    1. Keane, Michael P., 2010. "Structural vs. atheoretic approaches to econometrics," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 156(1), pages 3-20, May.
    2. Müller, Kai-Uwe, 2014. "Analyzing economic policies that affect supply and demand: a structural model of productivity, labor supply and rationing," Annual Conference 2014 (Hamburg): Evidence-based Economic Policy 100471, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    3. Laura Giuliano, 2013. "Minimum Wage Effects on Employment, Substitution, and the Teenage Labor Supply: Evidence from Personnel Data," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 31(1), pages 155-194.
    4. repec:eee:labeco:v:47:y:2017:i:c:p:163-181 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Flabbi, Luca & Mabli, James, 2012. "Household Search or Individual Search: Does It Matter? Evidence from Lifetime Inequality Estimates," IZA Discussion Papers 6908, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    6. Kemal Kizilca & João Cerejeira & Miguel Portela & Carla Sá, 2010. "Minimum wage, fringe benefits, overtime payments and the gender wage gap," NIPE Working Papers 34/2010, NIPE - Universidade do Minho.
    7. Ahn, Tom, 2011. "Distributional impacts of a local living wage increase with ability sorting," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 112(3), pages 283-286, September.
    8. Stephen Macdonald & Suwen Pan & Darren Hudson & Francis Tuan, 2014. "Toward a consumer economy in China: implications of changing wage policies for U.S. cotton exports," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 45(4), pages 513-524, July.
    9. Isaac Sorkin, 2015. "Are There Long-Run Effects of the Minimum Wage?," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 18(2), pages 306-333, April.
    10. Mueller, Kai-Uwe & Steiner, Viktor, 2013. "Behavioral effects of a federal minimum wage and income inequality in Germany," Annual Conference 2013 (Duesseldorf): Competition Policy and Regulation in a Global Economic Order 79784, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    11. Beauchamp Andrew & Chan Stacey, 2014. "The Minimum Wage and Crime," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 14(3), pages 1-23, July.
    12. Nicole Coomer & Walter Wessels, 2013. "The Effect of the Minimum Wage on Covered Teenage Employment," Journal of Labor Research, Springer, vol. 34(3), pages 253-280, September.
    13. Mirco Tonin, 2013. "Underreporting of earnings and the minimum wage spike," IZA Journal of European Labor Studies, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 2(1), pages 1-18, December.

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