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Understanding China's Long-Run Growth Process and Its Implications for Canada

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In the past 25 years, China has introduced numerous reforms, gradually moving from a centrally planned economy towards a socialist market economy capable of robust and sustainable economic growth. China's increasing integration into the global economy, which has been fuelled by this recent and rapid economic growth, has already begun to affect the economies of other countries and to present challenges for policy-makers, both in China and abroad. In addition to examining the determinants of China's past and current growth, the authors consider factors that are likely to support continued growth in the future and assess the implications for both the world and the Canadian economies.

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  • Michael Francis & François Painchaud & Sylvie Morin, 2005. "Understanding China's Long-Run Growth Process and Its Implications for Canada," Bank of Canada Review, Bank of Canada, vol. 2005(Spring), pages 5-17.
  • Handle: RePEc:bca:bcarev:v:2005:y:2005:i:spring05:p:5-17
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    Cited by:

    1. Alan Bollard & Mark Smith, 2006. "Major global developments in the new millennium," Reserve Bank of New Zealand Bulletin, Reserve Bank of New Zealand, vol. 69, pages 1-14., June.
    2. Mark Kruger & Walter Steingress & Sri Thanabalasingam, 2017. "Product Sophistication and the Slowdown in Chinese Export Growth," Discussion Papers 17-15, Bank of Canada.
    3. Brigitte Desroches & Michael Francis, 2006. "Institutional Quality, Trade, and the Changing Distribution of World Income," Staff Working Papers 06-19, Bank of Canada.

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