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Reducing cigarette consumption in California: Tobacco taxes vs an anti- smoking media campaign

Author

Listed:
  • Hu, T.-W.
  • Sung, H.-Y.
  • Keeler, T.E.

Abstract

Objectives. The purpose of this study was to examine the relative effects of taxation vs an anti-smoking media campaign on cigarette consumption in California. Methods. Quarterly cigarette sales data reported by the California State Board of Equalization between 1980 and 1992 were used to estimate a time-series model, adjusted for seasonal variations and time trends. Results. The estimated results show that sales of cigarettes were reduced by 819 million packs from the third quarter of 1990 through the fourth quarter of 1992 owing to an additional 25-cent state tax increase, while the anti-smoking media campaign reduced the cigarette sales by 232 million packs during the same period. Conclusions. Both taxation and anti- smoking media campaigns are effective means of reducing cigarette consumption. The strength of those effects, however, is influenced by the magnitude of the taxes and the amount of media campaign expenditures.

Suggested Citation

  • Hu, T.-W. & Sung, H.-Y. & Keeler, T.E., 1995. "Reducing cigarette consumption in California: Tobacco taxes vs an anti- smoking media campaign," American Journal of Public Health, American Public Health Association, vol. 85(9), pages 1218-1222.
  • Handle: RePEc:aph:ajpbhl:1995:85:9:1218-1222_0
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Theodore E. Keeler & Teh-wei Hu & Alison Keith & Richard Manning & Martin D. Marciniak & Michael Ong & Hai-Yen Sung, 2002. "The benefits of switching smoking cessation drugs to over-the-counter status," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 11(5), pages 389-402.
    2. Decicca, P. & Kenkel, D. & Mathios, A., 2000. "Putting Out the Fires: Will Higher Taxes Reduce Youth Smoking," Papers 00-3, Aarhus School of Business - Department of Economics.
    3. Alberto Abadie & Alexis Diamond & Jens Hainmueller, 2007. "Synthetic Control Methods for Comparative Case Studies: Estimating the Effect of California's Tobacco Control Program," NBER Working Papers 12831, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Galinato, Gregmar I. & Olanie, Aaron Z. & Yoder, Jonathan K., 2017. "The Trade and Health Effects of Tobacco Regulations," Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Western Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 42(3), September.
    5. Michelle Inness & Julian Barling & Keith Rogers & Nick Turner, 2008. "De-marketing Tobacco Through Price Changes and Consumer Attempts Quit Smoking," Journal of Business Ethics, Springer, vol. 77(4), pages 405-416, February.
    6. Beatty, Timothy K.M. & Larsen, Erling Røed & Sommervoll, Dag Einar, 2009. "Driven to drink: Sin taxes near a border," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 28(6), pages 1175-1184, December.
    7. Farrelly, Matthew C. & Pechacek, Terry F. & Chaloupka, Frank J., 2003. "The impact of tobacco control program expenditures on aggregate cigarette sales: 1981-2000," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 22(5), pages 843-859, September.
    8. Mei-ling Sheu & Teh-wei Hu & Theodore E. Keeler & Michael Ong & Hai-Yen Sung, 2004. "The effect of a major cigarette price change on smoking behavior in california: a zero-inflated negative binomial model," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 13(8), pages 781-791.
    9. Levy, David T. & Hyland, Andrew & Higbee, Cheryl & Remer, Lillian & Compton, Christine, 2007. "The role of public policies in reducing smoking prevalence in California: Results from the California Tobacco Policy Simulation Model," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 82(2), pages 167-185, July.
    10. Werfel, Seth H. & Jaffe, Adam B., 2013. "Induced innovation and technology trajectory: Evidence from smoking cessation products," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 42(1), pages 15-22.
    11. Hong Liu & Wei Tan, 2009. "The Effect of Anti-Smoking Media Campaign on Smoking Behavior: The California Experience," Annals of Economics and Finance, Society for AEF, vol. 10(1), pages 29-47, May.
    12. Yi-Wen Tsai & Chung-Lin Yang & Chin-Shyan Chen & Tsai-Ching Liu & Pei-Fen Chen, 2005. "The effect of Taiwan's tax-induced increases in cigarette prices on brand-switching and the consumption of cigarettes," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 14(6), pages 627-641.

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