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Research in public administration for the future


  • Geert Bouckaert

    () (Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Leuven, Belgium)


Discussing the future of research in public administration (PA) is more than just listing topics for reserach which are inspired by possible future challenges for the public sector. Even if national contexts determine a strong path dependency for research agendas, there are four major trends which affect the future of PA research: Europeanisation, reform agendas, globalisation issues, and marketisation of research. A crucial element in the debate is to know what the specific European voice is and should be in PA research. For this purpose it is necessary to explicitly organise research in PA.

Suggested Citation

  • Geert Bouckaert, 2010. "Research in public administration for the future," Society and Economy, Akadémiai Kiadó, Hungary, vol. 32(1), pages 3-15, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:aka:soceco:v:32:y:2010:i:1:p:3-15

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item


    future of research; Europe; organise research in public administration;

    JEL classification:

    • H83 - Public Economics - - Miscellaneous Issues - - - Public Administration


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