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How Do The Demographic Components Influence Job Satisfaction In The Hospitality Industry?

Author

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  • Derya KARA

    (Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Department of Hospitality and Tourism Management, Blacksburg, Virginia, USA)

Abstract

In this research, job satisfaction has been clarified according to different features of employees who work at accommodation establishments by emphasizing conceptual perspective about job satisfaction. Minnesota Satisfaction Questionnaire which evaluates job satisfaction regarding 20 dimensions has been used as a mean of data collection. Application field of the research consists of 397 employees who work at 5 star hotel establishments in Ankara. The data were solved using percent, frequency, mean, standard deviation, t-test, Anova and Tukey analysis. As a result of this research; it has been seen that, there is no statistical difference about job satisfaction level of employees work at hotel establishments considering their gender and marital status. Besides, it has been understood that, there is a statistical difference about job satisfaction level of employees considering their ages, education levels, incomes, and length of time in tourism sector.

Suggested Citation

  • Derya KARA, 2010. "How Do The Demographic Components Influence Job Satisfaction In The Hospitality Industry?," Review of Economic and Business Studies, Alexandru Ioan Cuza University, Faculty of Economics and Business Administration, issue 6, pages 199-210, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:aic:revebs:y:2011:i:6:karad
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    job satisfaction; demographic components of employee’s; accommodation establishments;

    JEL classification:

    • J28 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Safety; Job Satisfaction; Related Public Policy
    • L83 - Industrial Organization - - Industry Studies: Services - - - Sports; Gambling; Restaurants; Recreation; Tourism

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