IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/ags/jrapmc/132274.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Using Pedestrian Count Models to Estimate Urban Trail Traffic

Author

Listed:
  • Lindsey, Patrick
  • Lindsey, Greg

Abstract

Many cities are developing multiuse urban greenway trails to be used for recreation, exercise, and transportation. Analysts need many kinds of data about these new trails, but especially trail traffic because of its implications for the efficient allocation of resources for trail management. This paper addresses this need by presenting new information about the use of trails. We adapt and test the validity of a previously reported model that predicts hourly pedestrian crosswalk volume from shorter sampling intervals, and we apply the model to greenway trails. Based on 166 hours of data collection on an Indianapolis, Indiana trail system, we develop expansion equations for sampling intervals of five, ten, fifteen, and thirty minutes. We find that both the equations from the previous study and our new equations provide reasonably accurate hourly predictions. Trail managers can use these findings to make decisions about current trail maintenance and promotion.

Suggested Citation

  • Lindsey, Patrick & Lindsey, Greg, 2004. "Using Pedestrian Count Models to Estimate Urban Trail Traffic," Journal of Regional Analysis and Policy, Mid-Continent Regional Science Association, vol. 34(1).
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:jrapmc:132274
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/132274
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Poterba, James M., 1996. "Retail Price Reactions to Changes in State and Local Sales Taxes," National Tax Journal, National Tax Association, vol. 49(2), pages 165-176, June.
    2. Walsh, Michael J. & Jones, Jonathan D., 1988. "More Evidence on the "Border Tax" Effect: The Case of West Virginia, 1979-84," National Tax Journal, National Tax Association, vol. 41(2), pages 261-65, June.
    3. John L. Mikesell & C. Kurt Zorn, 1986. "Impact of the Sales Tax Rate on its Base: Evidence from a Small Town," Public Finance Review, , vol. 14(3), pages 329-338, July.
    4. A.F. Aisha Ghaus, 1995. "Optimal Local Sales Tax," Urban Studies, Urban Studies Journal Limited, vol. 32(8), pages 1369-1381, August.
    5. John D. Wong, 1996. "The Impact Of Local Option Sales Taxes On Retail Sales, Employment, Payrolls, And Establishments: The Case For Kansas," The Review of Regional Studies, Southern Regional Science Association, vol. 26(2), pages 166-176, Fall.
    6. J. L. Love, 1992. "Local Sales Tax Options: A Case Study Of South Georgia," The Review of Regional Studies, Southern Regional Science Association, vol. 22(1), pages 105-114, Summer.
    7. Ronald C. Fisher, 1980. "Local Sales Taxes: Tax Rate Differentials, Sales Loss, and Revenue Estimation," Public Finance Review, , vol. 8(2), pages 171-188, April.
    8. Poterba, James M., 1996. "Retail Price Reactions to Changes in State and Local Sales Taxes," National Tax Journal, National Tax Association, vol. 49(2), pages 165-76, June.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ags:jrapmc:132274. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (AgEcon Search). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/mcrsaea.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.