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Direct Marketing Local Food to Chefs: Chef Preferences and Perceived Obstacles

Author

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  • Curtis, Kynda R.
  • Cowee, Margaret W.

Abstract

Increasing consumer preferences for locally produced foods, exhibited by the nationwide expansion of farmers markets, is likely to affect food-service establishments. This study used a mail and telephone survey to evaluate chefs’ preferences and attitudes towards purchasing locally produced foods for their restaurants. Results show that chefs are most concerned with food quality, taste, and freshness. Chefs of small gourmet, independently owned restaurants are more likely to purchase local foods. Gourmet chefs are more concerned with food-production practices and thus see the value of purchasing local foods. Lack of information was found to be the largest hurdle to purchasing local products, clearly demonstrating the need for additional information and product samples from local producers.

Suggested Citation

  • Curtis, Kynda R. & Cowee, Margaret W., 2009. "Direct Marketing Local Food to Chefs: Chef Preferences and Perceived Obstacles," Journal of Food Distribution Research, Food Distribution Research Society, vol. 40(2), July.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:jlofdr:99784
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    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/99784
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    Cited by:

    1. Schmit, Todd M. & Hadcock, Stephen E., 2010. "Assessing barriers to expansion of farm-to-chef sales: a case study from upstate New York," Working Papers 126973, Cornell University, Department of Applied Economics and Management.
    2. Schmit, Todd M. & Lucke, Anne & Hadcock, Stephen E., 2010. "The Effectiveness of Farm-to-Chef Marketing of Local Foods: An Empirical Assessment from Columbia County, NY," EB Series 121634, Cornell University, Department of Applied Economics and Management.
    3. Thomas Krikser & Annette Piorr & Regine Berges & Ina Opitz, 2016. "Urban Agriculture Oriented towards Self-Supply, Social and Commercial Purpose: A Typology," Land, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 5(3), pages 1-19, August.
    4. Brain, Roslynn & Curtis, Kynda & Hall, Kelsey, 2015. "Utah Farm-Chef-Fork: Building Sustainabile Local Food Connections," Journal of Food Distribution Research, Food Distribution Research Society, vol. 46(1), March.
    5. Reynolds-Allie, Kenesha & Fields, Deacue, 2012. "A Comparative Analysis of Alabama Restaurants: Local vs Non-local Food Purchase," Journal of Food Distribution Research, Food Distribution Research Society, vol. 43(1), March.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Agribusiness; Marketing;

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