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The Impact of Weather Extremes on Agricultural Production Methods: Does Drought Increase Adoption of Conservation Tillage Practices?

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  • Ding, Ya
  • Schoengold, Karina
  • Tadesse, Tsegaye

Abstract

The paper combines panel data techniques with spatial analysis to measure the impact of extreme weather events on the adoption of conservation tillage. Zellner’s SUR technique is extended to spatial panel data to correct for cross-sectional heterogeneity, spatial autocorrelation, and contemporaneous correlation. Panel data allow the identification of differences in adoption rates. The adoption of no-till, other conservation tillage, and reduced-till are estimated relative to conventional tillage. Extremely dry conditions in recent years increase the adoption of other conservation tillage practices, while spring floods in the year of production reduce the use of no-till practices.

Suggested Citation

  • Ding, Ya & Schoengold, Karina & Tadesse, Tsegaye, 2009. "The Impact of Weather Extremes on Agricultural Production Methods: Does Drought Increase Adoption of Conservation Tillage Practices?," Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Western Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 34(3), December.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:jlaare:57631
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    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/57631
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Paul Baer & Clive L Spash, 2008. "Cost-Benefit Analysis of Climate Change: Stern Revisited," Socio-Economics and the Environment in Discussion (SEED) Working Paper Series 2008-07, CSIRO Sustainable Ecosystems.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Edward D. Perry & GianCarlo Moschini & David A. Hennessy, 2016. "Testing for Complementarity: Glyphosate Tolerant Soybeans and Conservation Tillage," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 98(3), pages 765-784.
    2. Sauer, Johannes & Finger, Robert, 2014. "Climate Risk Management Strategies in Agriculture – The Case of Flood Risk," 2014 Annual Meeting, July 27-29, 2014, Minneapolis, Minnesota 172679, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    3. Yong Jiang & Won Koo, 2014. "Estimating the local effect of weather on field crop production with unobserved producer behavior: a bioeconomic modeling framework," Environmental Economics and Policy Studies, Springer;Society for Environmental Economics and Policy Studies - SEEPS, vol. 16(3), pages 279-302, July.
    4. Hodde, Whitney & Sesmero, Juan & Gramig, Benjamin & Vyn, Tony & Doering, Otto, 2016. "Climate Change and the Economics of Conservation Tillage," 2016 Annual Meeting, July 31-August 2, 2016, Boston, Massachusetts 236090, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    5. Schoengold, Karina & Ding, Ya & Headlee, Russell, 2012. "The Impact of Ad-hoc Disaster Programs on the Use of Conservation Practices," 2012 Annual Meeting, August 12-14, 2012, Seattle, Washington 124957, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    6. Sung, Jae-hoon & Miranowski, John A., 2016. "Information technologies and field-level chemical use for corn production," 2016 Annual Meeting, July 31-August 2, 2016, Boston, Massachusetts 235858, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    7. Malcolm, Scott A. & Marshall, Elizabeth P. & Aillery, Marcel P. & Heisey, Paul W. & Livingston, Michael J. & Day-Rubenstein, Kelly A., 2012. "Agricultural Adaptation to a Changing Climate: Economic and Environmental Implications Vary by U.S. Region," Economic Research Report 127734, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
    8. Katengeza, Samson P. & Holden , Stein T. & Fisher , Monica, 2017. "Adoption of Soil Fertility Management Technologies in Malawi: Impact of Drought Exposure," CLTS Working Papers 11/17, Norwegian University of Life Sciences, Centre for Land Tenure Studies.
    9. Katengeza, Samson P. & Holden, Stein T. & Lunduka, Rodney W., 2016. "Adoption of Drought Tolerant Maize Varieties under Rainfall Stress in Malawi," 2016 AAAE Fifth International Conference, September 23-26, 2016, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia 246907, African Association of Agricultural Economists (AAAE).
    10. Malcolm, Scott A. & Marshall, Elizabeth P. & Aillery, Marcel P. & Heisey, Paul W. & Livingston, Michael J. & Day-Rubenstein, Kelly A., 2012. "Regional Economic and Environmental Impacts of Agricultural Adaptation to a Changing Climate in the United States," 2012 Annual Meeting, August 12-14, 2012, Seattle, Washington 124674, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    11. Wade, Tara & Kurkalova, Lyubov A. & Secchi, Silvia, 2012. "Using the logit model with aggregated choice data in estimation of Iowa corn farmers’ conservation tillage subsidies," 2012 Annual Meeting, August 12-14, 2012, Seattle, Washington 124974, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    12. Ayenew, Habtamu Yesigat & Sauer, Johannes & Abate-Kassa, Getachew, 2016. "Cost of Risk Exposure, Farm Disinvestment and Adaptation to Climate Uncertainties: The Case of Arable Farms in the EU," 2016 Annual Meeting, July 31-August 2, 2016, Boston, Massachusetts 235595, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.

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